Event Title

Water-Conserving Landscapes: An Evaluation of Landscape Drought Tolerance and Homeowner Preference

Presenter Information

Tony McCammon

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-27-2006 2:45 PM

End Date

3-27-2006 3:00 PM

Description

Water-Conserving Landscapes: An Evaluation of Landscape Drought Tolerance and Homeowner Preference Tony A. McCammon, Graduate MS Thesis, Plants, Soils, and Biometeorology Department, Utah State University Kelly L. Kopp, Plants, Soils, and Biometeorology Department, Utah State University Abstract: This research assessed landscape drought response of three integrated Xeriscapes™ at the Utah Botanical Center in Davis County, Utah. The landscapes differed only in the plant material utilized and contained traditionally used plant species, drought-adapted plant species, or a mixture of the two. The landscapes were subjected to a 6-week dry down period during the summer of 2005. Stress ratings, stomatal conductance, and turfgrass canopy temperatures were measured. Homeowner perceptions of the landscapes were also assessed before and after the 6-week, imposed dry down using a survey instrument. Stomatal conductance was significantly different across landscapes, plants, and time. Stomatal conductance of plants in the drought-adapted landscapes was significantly higher than the traditional or mixed landscapes over the course of the dry down. Of all the landscapes, the mixed landscape exhibited the fewest visual signs of drought stress as well as moderate levels of stomatal conductance. Additionally, the mixed landscape had the lowest turfgrass canopy temperatures, indicating that it was the least stressed of the landscapes throughout the dry down period. Drought-adapted and mixed landscapes showed less visual and physiological stress under the imposed dry down conditions, and homeowners preferred them to traditional landscapes. This suggests that homeowners respond favorably to alternative plant materials in the landscape under drought conditions. A focus on Xeriscape™ education, practices, and visual exposure may result in greater adoption of these plant materials and practices by homeowners and may also result in significant residential water savings.

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Mar 27th, 2:45 PM Mar 27th, 3:00 PM

Water-Conserving Landscapes: An Evaluation of Landscape Drought Tolerance and Homeowner Preference

Eccles Conference Center

Water-Conserving Landscapes: An Evaluation of Landscape Drought Tolerance and Homeowner Preference Tony A. McCammon, Graduate MS Thesis, Plants, Soils, and Biometeorology Department, Utah State University Kelly L. Kopp, Plants, Soils, and Biometeorology Department, Utah State University Abstract: This research assessed landscape drought response of three integrated Xeriscapes™ at the Utah Botanical Center in Davis County, Utah. The landscapes differed only in the plant material utilized and contained traditionally used plant species, drought-adapted plant species, or a mixture of the two. The landscapes were subjected to a 6-week dry down period during the summer of 2005. Stress ratings, stomatal conductance, and turfgrass canopy temperatures were measured. Homeowner perceptions of the landscapes were also assessed before and after the 6-week, imposed dry down using a survey instrument. Stomatal conductance was significantly different across landscapes, plants, and time. Stomatal conductance of plants in the drought-adapted landscapes was significantly higher than the traditional or mixed landscapes over the course of the dry down. Of all the landscapes, the mixed landscape exhibited the fewest visual signs of drought stress as well as moderate levels of stomatal conductance. Additionally, the mixed landscape had the lowest turfgrass canopy temperatures, indicating that it was the least stressed of the landscapes throughout the dry down period. Drought-adapted and mixed landscapes showed less visual and physiological stress under the imposed dry down conditions, and homeowners preferred them to traditional landscapes. This suggests that homeowners respond favorably to alternative plant materials in the landscape under drought conditions. A focus on Xeriscape™ education, practices, and visual exposure may result in greater adoption of these plant materials and practices by homeowners and may also result in significant residential water savings.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2006/AllAbstracts/51