Event Title

Spawning Habitat Selection of an Endemic Sculpin Cottus Extensus

Presenter Information

Justin Robinson
Chris Luecke

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-27-2006 10:05 AM

End Date

3-27-2006 10:10 AM

Description

Endemic fishes face unique challenges due to their limited distribution. Short-term ecological cycles and anthropogenic changes increase stressors and magnify the limitations induced by endemicism. In Bear Lake, Utah/Idaho, we analyzed the distribution of the endemic Bear Lake sculpin (Cottus extensus) in relation to substrate selection for spawning sites. Cottus extensus utilized only rocky sites that allowed for subterranean nest sites. No spawning activity was observed on any substrate except piled rock, including embedded rock. Distribution of nesting sites within rocky habitats was related to depth. Higher nest densities were associated with rock at depths between 1-3 meters, though nests were observed in all rock habitats sampled in the lake. Egg mass size and number of egg masses per nest were analyzed to identify patterns of distribution related to rock size and depth. Number of egg masses per nest increased slightly in association with rock size and was negatively correlated with increasing depth. A comparison of nest density with a study by Ruzycki (1998) indicated that the density of nests was greater during low water years typical of that study.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 27th, 10:05 AM Mar 27th, 10:10 AM

Spawning Habitat Selection of an Endemic Sculpin Cottus Extensus

Eccles Conference Center

Endemic fishes face unique challenges due to their limited distribution. Short-term ecological cycles and anthropogenic changes increase stressors and magnify the limitations induced by endemicism. In Bear Lake, Utah/Idaho, we analyzed the distribution of the endemic Bear Lake sculpin (Cottus extensus) in relation to substrate selection for spawning sites. Cottus extensus utilized only rocky sites that allowed for subterranean nest sites. No spawning activity was observed on any substrate except piled rock, including embedded rock. Distribution of nesting sites within rocky habitats was related to depth. Higher nest densities were associated with rock at depths between 1-3 meters, though nests were observed in all rock habitats sampled in the lake. Egg mass size and number of egg masses per nest were analyzed to identify patterns of distribution related to rock size and depth. Number of egg masses per nest increased slightly in association with rock size and was negatively correlated with increasing depth. A comparison of nest density with a study by Ruzycki (1998) indicated that the density of nests was greater during low water years typical of that study.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2006/AllPosters/12