Event Title

Snow Processes as a Function of Vegetation at the TW Daniel Experimental Forest

Presenter Information

Vinod Mahat

Location

ECC 303/305

Event Website

https://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-31-2008 11:30 AM

End Date

3-31-2008 11:45 AM

Description

This paper examines the differences in snow accumulation, sublimation, redistribution and melts for open and forested areas for the purpose of improving our ability to model and forecast snowmelt driven streamflow as a function of vegetation. In forests the canopy intercepts snow fall, modifies the exchange of energy between the snow surface under the canopy and the atmosphere, and significantly affects snowmelt under the canopy. Snow surveys were carried out at regular intervals in 2007 and 2008 at the TW Daniel experimental Forest to understand the differences in snow processes in open and forested areas. During the snow accumulation period, the field data show higher rates of accumulation in open areas than in forested areas. The rates of ablation were also found to be higher in open areas. The physically based Utah energy balance (UEB) snowmelt model has the ability to predict snowmelt driven by weather data. UEB adjusts some of the energy exchanges based on the forest density. The UEB model was run for the TWDEF site in an open and forested setting so as to examine how well the model works in representing the differences in snowmelt as a function of vegetation. Comparisons of the model with measurements are being used to learn how to better represent snow processes as function of vegetation in the UEB model.

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Mar 31st, 11:30 AM Mar 31st, 11:45 AM

Snow Processes as a Function of Vegetation at the TW Daniel Experimental Forest

ECC 303/305

This paper examines the differences in snow accumulation, sublimation, redistribution and melts for open and forested areas for the purpose of improving our ability to model and forecast snowmelt driven streamflow as a function of vegetation. In forests the canopy intercepts snow fall, modifies the exchange of energy between the snow surface under the canopy and the atmosphere, and significantly affects snowmelt under the canopy. Snow surveys were carried out at regular intervals in 2007 and 2008 at the TW Daniel experimental Forest to understand the differences in snow processes in open and forested areas. During the snow accumulation period, the field data show higher rates of accumulation in open areas than in forested areas. The rates of ablation were also found to be higher in open areas. The physically based Utah energy balance (UEB) snowmelt model has the ability to predict snowmelt driven by weather data. UEB adjusts some of the energy exchanges based on the forest density. The UEB model was run for the TWDEF site in an open and forested setting so as to examine how well the model works in representing the differences in snowmelt as a function of vegetation. Comparisons of the model with measurements are being used to learn how to better represent snow processes as function of vegetation in the UEB model.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2008/AllAbstracts/11