Event Title

The Hydrologic Cycle and the Color of Snow

Presenter Information

Jeff Dozier

Location

ECC 216

Event Website

https://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

4-1-2008 2:30 PM

End Date

4-1-2008 3:15 PM

Description

Snow is among the most “colorful” materials in nature, but most of the variability in snow reflectivity occurs beyond the visible spectrum. In these wavelengths, albedo decreases dramatically as the snow grains evolve and grow, whereas in the visible spectrum the snow albedo is degraded by contaminants such as dust, algae, and soot. From daily MODIS data, we estimate the fraction of each 500m pixel that snow covers, along with the albedo of that snow. In the current generation of climate and snowmelt models, snow albedo is typically either prescribed or represented by empirical aging functions, when truly it is a dynamic variable affected by grain growth and lightabsorbing impurities.

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Apr 1st, 2:30 PM Apr 1st, 3:15 PM

The Hydrologic Cycle and the Color of Snow

ECC 216

Snow is among the most “colorful” materials in nature, but most of the variability in snow reflectivity occurs beyond the visible spectrum. In these wavelengths, albedo decreases dramatically as the snow grains evolve and grow, whereas in the visible spectrum the snow albedo is degraded by contaminants such as dust, algae, and soot. From daily MODIS data, we estimate the fraction of each 500m pixel that snow covers, along with the albedo of that snow. In the current generation of climate and snowmelt models, snow albedo is typically either prescribed or represented by empirical aging functions, when truly it is a dynamic variable affected by grain growth and lightabsorbing impurities.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2008/AllAbstracts/36