Event Title

Technology Development to Meet Western Water Challenges

Presenter Information

Paul D. Campbell

Location

ECC 216

Event Website

https://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

4-1-2008 9:00 AM

End Date

4-1-2008 9:45 AM

Description

Thirst for water in the Western United States is embedded in our culture. Past developments allowed the west to temporarily quench its thirst and become what it is today. Damming the rivers stemmed flooding, provided agricultural development, and yielded a direct return on investment with the hydro-electric power that was generated. Today, however, we face some accounting for long-term impacts of these past developments. We also must confront environmental impacts of industrialization and higher density population. As western U.S. urbanization and sub-urbanization is taking place, water resources are being stretched. Today’s challenges equal tomorrow’s opportunities, and one of those opportunities is the development of new technology. New developments will optimize our use of water, better protect water quality, and offer a higher resolution of assessment and allocation of water resources. Emergence of new technology requires favorable market conditions, which are impacted by public policy. A case study will be presented that demonstrates the interaction between public policies, standards, and consumer acceptance of new water saving technology.

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Apr 1st, 9:00 AM Apr 1st, 9:45 AM

Technology Development to Meet Western Water Challenges

ECC 216

Thirst for water in the Western United States is embedded in our culture. Past developments allowed the west to temporarily quench its thirst and become what it is today. Damming the rivers stemmed flooding, provided agricultural development, and yielded a direct return on investment with the hydro-electric power that was generated. Today, however, we face some accounting for long-term impacts of these past developments. We also must confront environmental impacts of industrialization and higher density population. As western U.S. urbanization and sub-urbanization is taking place, water resources are being stretched. Today’s challenges equal tomorrow’s opportunities, and one of those opportunities is the development of new technology. New developments will optimize our use of water, better protect water quality, and offer a higher resolution of assessment and allocation of water resources. Emergence of new technology requires favorable market conditions, which are impacted by public policy. A case study will be presented that demonstrates the interaction between public policies, standards, and consumer acceptance of new water saving technology.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2008/AllAbstracts/48