Event Title

Methods for Quantifying Groundwater and Surface Water Interactions in Curtis Creek

Presenter Information

Noah Schmadel

Location

ECC 216

Event Website

https://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

3-31-2008 6:50 PM

End Date

3-31-2008 6:55 PM

Description

Neilson [2006] published results from a study conducted in the Virgin River, UT, where a data collection methodology was developed to assist in modeling the separate effects of hyporheic and dead zones on heat and solute transport. This study was unique in that both temperature and tracer data were collected in the main channel, hyporheic zone, and dead zones to help estimate parameters associated with a two zone modeling approach rather than previous one zone modeling approaches which lump the effects of hyporheic and dead zones (transient storage). Research on a small section of Curtis Creek, UT, investigated whether the data collection methodology and modeling approach developed by Neilson for a desert river system could be implemented in a mountain stream system with gravel/cobble substrate and higher average channel slopes that are highly influenced by groundwater. This study has resulted in a number of new data types being collected in order to begin to separate out some of the complex and confounded sources and sinks of heat and mass. These data types include; mapping riparian shading, detailed channel surveys, groundwater observation wells, and an increased number of tracer tests to assist in quantifying groundwater influx (i.e., dilution studies). Additionally, new installation techniques had to be developed for equipment inserted in the bed substrate. Preliminary results and installation techniques will be presented.

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Mar 31st, 6:50 PM Mar 31st, 6:55 PM

Methods for Quantifying Groundwater and Surface Water Interactions in Curtis Creek

ECC 216

Neilson [2006] published results from a study conducted in the Virgin River, UT, where a data collection methodology was developed to assist in modeling the separate effects of hyporheic and dead zones on heat and solute transport. This study was unique in that both temperature and tracer data were collected in the main channel, hyporheic zone, and dead zones to help estimate parameters associated with a two zone modeling approach rather than previous one zone modeling approaches which lump the effects of hyporheic and dead zones (transient storage). Research on a small section of Curtis Creek, UT, investigated whether the data collection methodology and modeling approach developed by Neilson for a desert river system could be implemented in a mountain stream system with gravel/cobble substrate and higher average channel slopes that are highly influenced by groundwater. This study has resulted in a number of new data types being collected in order to begin to separate out some of the complex and confounded sources and sinks of heat and mass. These data types include; mapping riparian shading, detailed channel surveys, groundwater observation wells, and an increased number of tracer tests to assist in quantifying groundwater influx (i.e., dilution studies). Additionally, new installation techniques had to be developed for equipment inserted in the bed substrate. Preliminary results and installation techniques will be presented.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2008/Posters/7