Event Title

Sources of Arsenic in Groundwater in Cache County, Utah

Presenter Information

Renn Lambert

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/

Start Date

4-21-2010 10:25 AM

End Date

4-21-2010 10:30 AM

Description

There are reports of arsenic in groundwater in many parts of the world including throughout Utah. Many groundwater wells throughout Cache County, UT, have levels of arsenic that exceed the drinking water limit. There was no obvious source or pattern in the distribution of this groundwater arsenic. Sediment cores were collected from an area near the Logan Landfill that has a network of groundwater monitoring wells. The geochemistry of the arsenic in the sediments was characterized, showing that the arsenic was associated with native minerals. Anaerobic microcosms containing sediments and groundwater from the site were constructed and analyzed over time to evaluate the extent of arsenic release due to microbial processes. Arsenic release was enhanced with the addition of glucose or acetate as the carbon and energy source compared with the no added carbon treatment. The microcosm study demonstrated that the release of arsenic to groundwater was limited by the bioavailibility of carbon.

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Apr 21st, 10:25 AM Apr 21st, 10:30 AM

Sources of Arsenic in Groundwater in Cache County, Utah

Eccles Conference Center

There are reports of arsenic in groundwater in many parts of the world including throughout Utah. Many groundwater wells throughout Cache County, UT, have levels of arsenic that exceed the drinking water limit. There was no obvious source or pattern in the distribution of this groundwater arsenic. Sediment cores were collected from an area near the Logan Landfill that has a network of groundwater monitoring wells. The geochemistry of the arsenic in the sediments was characterized, showing that the arsenic was associated with native minerals. Anaerobic microcosms containing sediments and groundwater from the site were constructed and analyzed over time to evaluate the extent of arsenic release due to microbial processes. Arsenic release was enhanced with the addition of glucose or acetate as the carbon and energy source compared with the no added carbon treatment. The microcosm study demonstrated that the release of arsenic to groundwater was limited by the bioavailibility of carbon.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2010/Posters/5