Event Title

Integrating Water Quality and Quantity Aspects of Irrigation Management for an Area in the Lower Bear River Watershed

Presenter Information

Jonna Van Opstal

Location

ECC 307/309

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences/2012-spring-runoff-conference

Start Date

4-4-2012 1:30 PM

End Date

4-4-2012 10:50 AM

Description

The Lower Bear River watershed has experienced several exceptionally wet and dry years during the past decade. These varying weather conditions influences the irrigation management at a regional and field scale. At the scale of the irrigation system the Bear River Canal Company is responsible for irrigation management; the farmers are the decision makers at field scale. This study analyses both the water quantity and quality aspects of irrigation management for this location. The years 2004 and 2011 are chosen as examples for exceptionally dry and wet years, respectively. Water quantity is represented as components of the hydrological water balance. The main consumptive water use of an agricultural area is evapotranspiration (ET). This quantity is estimated with remote sensing using an energy balance model. Additionally, crop classification indicates the crop choice of the farmers according to the weather conditions. The use of remote sensing techniques for calculating ET, provides insight both on irrigation system and field scale. The concentration of nutrients in surface water is under influence of the quantity of water in the system because of dilution of the nutrient loading. Environmental studies consider agricultural runoff to be an important non-point source of nutrient pollution in surface water. Key nutrients, namely nitrogen and phosphorus, causes water streams such as the Bear River and Malad River to be polluted, which has consequences for the Bird Refuge and other water users downstream. Therefore, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the water are frequently measured in these streams. These measurements are compared to analyze the difference in irrigation management for an exceptionally wet and dry year. Results from this study present the interactions between water quantity and quality for varying weather conditions in the irrigation area of the Lower Bear River watershed. These factors have an influence on the irrigation management at the system and field level. Insight on the impact of water quantity and quality on irrigation management aids the local decision makers. It provides an improved understanding of the farming practices and anticipates for future years with exceptional weather conditions.

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Apr 4th, 1:30 PM Apr 4th, 10:50 AM

Integrating Water Quality and Quantity Aspects of Irrigation Management for an Area in the Lower Bear River Watershed

ECC 307/309

The Lower Bear River watershed has experienced several exceptionally wet and dry years during the past decade. These varying weather conditions influences the irrigation management at a regional and field scale. At the scale of the irrigation system the Bear River Canal Company is responsible for irrigation management; the farmers are the decision makers at field scale. This study analyses both the water quantity and quality aspects of irrigation management for this location. The years 2004 and 2011 are chosen as examples for exceptionally dry and wet years, respectively. Water quantity is represented as components of the hydrological water balance. The main consumptive water use of an agricultural area is evapotranspiration (ET). This quantity is estimated with remote sensing using an energy balance model. Additionally, crop classification indicates the crop choice of the farmers according to the weather conditions. The use of remote sensing techniques for calculating ET, provides insight both on irrigation system and field scale. The concentration of nutrients in surface water is under influence of the quantity of water in the system because of dilution of the nutrient loading. Environmental studies consider agricultural runoff to be an important non-point source of nutrient pollution in surface water. Key nutrients, namely nitrogen and phosphorus, causes water streams such as the Bear River and Malad River to be polluted, which has consequences for the Bird Refuge and other water users downstream. Therefore, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the water are frequently measured in these streams. These measurements are compared to analyze the difference in irrigation management for an exceptionally wet and dry year. Results from this study present the interactions between water quantity and quality for varying weather conditions in the irrigation area of the Lower Bear River watershed. These factors have an influence on the irrigation management at the system and field level. Insight on the impact of water quantity and quality on irrigation management aids the local decision makers. It provides an improved understanding of the farming practices and anticipates for future years with exceptional weather conditions.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2012/AllAbstracts/48