Event Title

Pipes, drains, and efficiency gains: Local water management organizations, their decisions, and adaptive responses

Presenter Information

Andrea Armstrong
Douglas Jackson-Smith

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

4-1-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

4-1-2014 1:20 PM

Description

Research on western water issues typically focus on large-scale, inter-basin issues of water supply and sustainability, or individual water use patterns and inefficiencies. In reality, water management and governance occurs at interconnected macro-institutional, meso-watershed, and micro-individual scales—all of which are important for water resources management in northern Utah. The focus of our research is at the meso-scale, within which many local water management organizations (LWMOs)—particularly small city governments and agricultural irrigation organizations—make critical decisions surrounding water quality and quantity. Drawing upon interview and survey data, we identify and describe four types of linkages that connect LWMOs to one another. We then analyze the ways in which LWMOs are adaptively responding to key changes in urbanization and water availability. Two common adaptive processes are: (a) improving infrastructure efficiency, and (b) engaging in organizational partnerships.

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Apr 1st, 1:00 PM Apr 1st, 1:20 PM

Pipes, drains, and efficiency gains: Local water management organizations, their decisions, and adaptive responses

Eccles Conference Center

Research on western water issues typically focus on large-scale, inter-basin issues of water supply and sustainability, or individual water use patterns and inefficiencies. In reality, water management and governance occurs at interconnected macro-institutional, meso-watershed, and micro-individual scales—all of which are important for water resources management in northern Utah. The focus of our research is at the meso-scale, within which many local water management organizations (LWMOs)—particularly small city governments and agricultural irrigation organizations—make critical decisions surrounding water quality and quantity. Drawing upon interview and survey data, we identify and describe four types of linkages that connect LWMOs to one another. We then analyze the ways in which LWMOs are adaptively responding to key changes in urbanization and water availability. Two common adaptive processes are: (a) improving infrastructure efficiency, and (b) engaging in organizational partnerships.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2014/2014Abstracts/17