Event Title

Gain-Loss Study on the Lower San Rafael River, South Central Utah

Location

Eccles Conference Center Auditorium

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

3-31-2015 1:20 AM

End Date

3-31-2015 1:30 AM

Description

The San Rafael River is one of the most over-allocated rivers in all of Utah. The river has approximately 360 dams and 800 surface points of diversion. It is impacted by fragmentation, dewatering, non-native species, and channelization. The purpose of this study was to assess the groundwater gains and losses of stream flow that affect the Lower San Rafael River. The section of the river analyzed runs from highway I-70 downstream to the confluence of the Green River, or the lower 55 miles of the river. To calculate the gains and losses of flow along this stretch of river, in-stream discharge measurements were repeatedly taken at different points along the study reach from May to September 2014. Pressure transducers were also installed at five sites to establish a stage-discharge relationship at these locations and determine how exchanges varied over shorter timescales. With these data, we found a significant effect of a major water diversion at low flow conditions and that sections of the river gained and lost groundwater differently throughout the summer season. The results from this study will help inform water managers when best to allocate water releases, especially during critical summer months and periods of low flow.

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Mar 31st, 1:20 AM Mar 31st, 1:30 AM

Gain-Loss Study on the Lower San Rafael River, South Central Utah

Eccles Conference Center Auditorium

The San Rafael River is one of the most over-allocated rivers in all of Utah. The river has approximately 360 dams and 800 surface points of diversion. It is impacted by fragmentation, dewatering, non-native species, and channelization. The purpose of this study was to assess the groundwater gains and losses of stream flow that affect the Lower San Rafael River. The section of the river analyzed runs from highway I-70 downstream to the confluence of the Green River, or the lower 55 miles of the river. To calculate the gains and losses of flow along this stretch of river, in-stream discharge measurements were repeatedly taken at different points along the study reach from May to September 2014. Pressure transducers were also installed at five sites to establish a stage-discharge relationship at these locations and determine how exchanges varied over shorter timescales. With these data, we found a significant effect of a major water diversion at low flow conditions and that sections of the river gained and lost groundwater differently throughout the summer season. The results from this study will help inform water managers when best to allocate water releases, especially during critical summer months and periods of low flow.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2015/2015Posters/7