Event Title

Effective Control of Small, Dense Phragmites Australis Patches in Great Salt Lake Wetlands

Location

Eccles Conference Center Auditorium

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu

Start Date

3-31-2015 1:10 AM

End Date

3-31-2015 1:20 AM

Description

Phragmites australis has been expanding rapidly in the wetlands of the Great Salt Lake (GSL). Here we present the first two years of results for a multi-year study which examines the effectiveness of six treatments for controlling small (50mx20m), dense patches of Phragmites along the eastern shore of the GSL. The treatments are 1.) summer mow, fall glyphosate spray, 2.) summer glyphosate spray, winter mow, 3.) fall glyphosate spray, winter mow, 4.) summer imazapyr spray, winter mow, 5.) summer mow, then black plastic solarization, 6.) untreated control. We found that all herbicide treatments, regardless of timing, were equally effective at reducing Phragmites percent cover. Summer mowing and summer herbicide spraying significantly reduced Phragmites inflorescence density compared with the fall herbicide treatment, greatly limiting the ability of Phragmites to spread further by seed. At this early stage, native plant recovery following all treatments was minimal, likely because of the deep litter layer that remains in all plots. The findings from this multi-year study will be used to develop best management practices for controlling Phragmites in GSL wetlands.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 31st, 1:10 AM Mar 31st, 1:20 AM

Effective Control of Small, Dense Phragmites Australis Patches in Great Salt Lake Wetlands

Eccles Conference Center Auditorium

Phragmites australis has been expanding rapidly in the wetlands of the Great Salt Lake (GSL). Here we present the first two years of results for a multi-year study which examines the effectiveness of six treatments for controlling small (50mx20m), dense patches of Phragmites along the eastern shore of the GSL. The treatments are 1.) summer mow, fall glyphosate spray, 2.) summer glyphosate spray, winter mow, 3.) fall glyphosate spray, winter mow, 4.) summer imazapyr spray, winter mow, 5.) summer mow, then black plastic solarization, 6.) untreated control. We found that all herbicide treatments, regardless of timing, were equally effective at reducing Phragmites percent cover. Summer mowing and summer herbicide spraying significantly reduced Phragmites inflorescence density compared with the fall herbicide treatment, greatly limiting the ability of Phragmites to spread further by seed. At this early stage, native plant recovery following all treatments was minimal, likely because of the deep litter layer that remains in all plots. The findings from this multi-year study will be used to develop best management practices for controlling Phragmites in GSL wetlands.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2015/2015Posters/8