Event Title

Resilience to Climate Change: Focus on Economics of Aquatic Invasive Species

Presenter Information

Jason Shogren

Location

ECC 216 - Auditorium

Streaming Media

Start Date

3-29-2017 9:10 AM

End Date

3-29-2017 9:40 AM

Description

Abstract:

In a world of climate change risk, invasive species policy becomes an economic issue too. Policymakers make significant investments to control both the ecological and economic risks posed by invasive species. This talk will explore why economics matters for invasive species policy. First, economics matters because it helps frame both the science and policy discussion around an integrated framework. Second, economics matters because it focuses on how to evaluate alternative policy options that strive for more protection at less costs. Third, economics matters by providing insight into underlying incentives at work when flexibility and timing matters. Fourth, economics matters by examining how to balance the public’s understanding versus expert judgment on invasive species management.

Comments

Jason Shogren - University of Wyoming - Department of Economics

Bio: Jason Shogren is the Stroock Professor of Natural Resource Conservation and Management in the Department of Economics at the University of Wyoming, his alma mater. He studies the behavioral economic underpinnings of environmental policy. Shogren is a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. He was a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and a senior economist on the Council of Economic Advisers in the White House. He is a Fellow of the Association of Environmental & Resource Economists, the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association, and the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 29th, 9:10 AM Mar 29th, 9:40 AM

Resilience to Climate Change: Focus on Economics of Aquatic Invasive Species

ECC 216 - Auditorium

Abstract:

In a world of climate change risk, invasive species policy becomes an economic issue too. Policymakers make significant investments to control both the ecological and economic risks posed by invasive species. This talk will explore why economics matters for invasive species policy. First, economics matters because it helps frame both the science and policy discussion around an integrated framework. Second, economics matters because it focuses on how to evaluate alternative policy options that strive for more protection at less costs. Third, economics matters by providing insight into underlying incentives at work when flexibility and timing matters. Fourth, economics matters by examining how to balance the public’s understanding versus expert judgment on invasive species management.