Event Title

Beaver River Watershed Tour and Pesticide Training

Presenter Information

Mark Nelson

Location

Logan Country Club

Streaming Media

Start Date

3-28-2017 3:40 PM

End Date

3-28-2017 3:45 PM

Description

The Beaver River is the life blood of Beaver County. It is used as a fishery, a recreation area and is the main source of irrigation water for farmers in Beaver County. Through monitoring of the Beaver River a variety of problems ranging from high rates of sediment movement to high amounts of phosphorus have been identified. Because of this monitoring, we received EPA 319 funding to help farmers control sediment and animal waste in the Beaver River watershed. I found that one of the best ways for farmers to adopt new practices is to show them how these practices have worked for their neighbors. By putting together an annual watershed tour, many more farmers signed up for this funding and have been able to implement best management practices in the watershed. I also found that by conducting the Beaver River watershed tour and pesticide training on the same day, farmers could receive continuing education pesticide credits that are needed in order for the farmers to keep current private pesticide licenses. Each year participants receive credits in pesticide use, safety and law. A total of six credits are needed over a three year period. Farmers must have a private pesticide license in order to buy restricted chemicals such as insecticides and rodenticides. Holding the joint meeting accomplishes the goals of the watershed tour and provides continuing education credits for those needing to maintain a pesticide license. Since combining the watershed tour with the pesticide training we have been able to increase the attendance at the program from an average of 36 farmers to an average of 55 farmers, an increase of 36%. This shows that combining educational programs better meets the needs and time restraints of local producers. Addressing subjects that are important to the farmers also helps increase attendance at the programs. Some of the subjects we have covered in the tour and training include: use of drones in agriculture, sprayer calibration, range grass selection, weed control, manure management, and stream bank restoration.

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Mar 28th, 3:40 PM Mar 28th, 3:45 PM

Beaver River Watershed Tour and Pesticide Training

Logan Country Club

The Beaver River is the life blood of Beaver County. It is used as a fishery, a recreation area and is the main source of irrigation water for farmers in Beaver County. Through monitoring of the Beaver River a variety of problems ranging from high rates of sediment movement to high amounts of phosphorus have been identified. Because of this monitoring, we received EPA 319 funding to help farmers control sediment and animal waste in the Beaver River watershed. I found that one of the best ways for farmers to adopt new practices is to show them how these practices have worked for their neighbors. By putting together an annual watershed tour, many more farmers signed up for this funding and have been able to implement best management practices in the watershed. I also found that by conducting the Beaver River watershed tour and pesticide training on the same day, farmers could receive continuing education pesticide credits that are needed in order for the farmers to keep current private pesticide licenses. Each year participants receive credits in pesticide use, safety and law. A total of six credits are needed over a three year period. Farmers must have a private pesticide license in order to buy restricted chemicals such as insecticides and rodenticides. Holding the joint meeting accomplishes the goals of the watershed tour and provides continuing education credits for those needing to maintain a pesticide license. Since combining the watershed tour with the pesticide training we have been able to increase the attendance at the program from an average of 36 farmers to an average of 55 farmers, an increase of 36%. This shows that combining educational programs better meets the needs and time restraints of local producers. Addressing subjects that are important to the farmers also helps increase attendance at the programs. Some of the subjects we have covered in the tour and training include: use of drones in agriculture, sprayer calibration, range grass selection, weed control, manure management, and stream bank restoration.