Session

Technical Session VIII: University Programs

Abstract

A powerfully instrumented, reliable, low-cost 3-axis stabilized nanosatellite is in final design using novel technologies. The Thunderstorm Effects in Space: Technology (TEST) nanosatellite implements a new, highly modular satellite bus structure and common electrical interface that is conducive to satellite modeling, development, testing, and integration flow. TEST is a low-cost ($0.1 – 0.2 M) nanosatellite (30kg) in final development by Taylor University and the University of Illinois through the Air Force Office of Space Research (AFOSR) University Nanosatellite program. TEST implements a strong variety of plasma, energetic particle, and remote sensing instrumentation with the objective of understanding how lighting and thunderstorms influence the upper atmosphere and the near-space environment. As a disruptive technology, the TEST modular design and instrumentation challenges portions of satellite systems (such as future DOD DMSP and NASA LWS Geospace Missions), while complementing large multi-probe and remote sensing programs. TEST includes a variety of proven instrumentation: two 1m Electric Field (EP) probes, a thermal plasma density Langmuir Probe (LP), a 0.5 to 30 kHz Very Low Frequency (VLF) Receiver, two large geometric factor cooled (-60° C) Solid State Detector (SSD) spectrometers for energetic electrons and ions (10 keV < E <1 MeV), a 3-axis Magnetometer (MAG), a O2 Hertzberg UV Photometer, a 391.4 nm Transient Photometer and a 630 nm Imager for airglow and lightning measurements. In addition, the satellite is three-axis stabilized using CO2 band horizon sensors, as well as a twostage passive radiator for instrument cooling. TEST instrumentation and satellite subsystems are packaged in modular cubes of 4in increments (CubeSat3).

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Aug 11th, 3:15 PM

A Highly Modular Scientific Nanosatellite: TEST

A powerfully instrumented, reliable, low-cost 3-axis stabilized nanosatellite is in final design using novel technologies. The Thunderstorm Effects in Space: Technology (TEST) nanosatellite implements a new, highly modular satellite bus structure and common electrical interface that is conducive to satellite modeling, development, testing, and integration flow. TEST is a low-cost ($0.1 – 0.2 M) nanosatellite (30kg) in final development by Taylor University and the University of Illinois through the Air Force Office of Space Research (AFOSR) University Nanosatellite program. TEST implements a strong variety of plasma, energetic particle, and remote sensing instrumentation with the objective of understanding how lighting and thunderstorms influence the upper atmosphere and the near-space environment. As a disruptive technology, the TEST modular design and instrumentation challenges portions of satellite systems (such as future DOD DMSP and NASA LWS Geospace Missions), while complementing large multi-probe and remote sensing programs. TEST includes a variety of proven instrumentation: two 1m Electric Field (EP) probes, a thermal plasma density Langmuir Probe (LP), a 0.5 to 30 kHz Very Low Frequency (VLF) Receiver, two large geometric factor cooled (-60° C) Solid State Detector (SSD) spectrometers for energetic electrons and ions (10 keV < E <1 MeV), a 3-axis Magnetometer (MAG), a O2 Hertzberg UV Photometer, a 391.4 nm Transient Photometer and a 630 nm Imager for airglow and lightning measurements. In addition, the satellite is three-axis stabilized using CO2 band horizon sensors, as well as a twostage passive radiator for instrument cooling. TEST instrumentation and satellite subsystems are packaged in modular cubes of 4in increments (CubeSat3).