Session

Technical Session III: Science/Mission Payloads

Location

Utah State University, Logan, UT

Abstract

The Ball Operational Weather Instrument Evolution-Microwave (BOWIE-M) is a compact cross-track scanning microwave radiometer combining design heritage from several radiometers as well as from IR&D efforts. Miniaturized RF electronics, a digital receiver and a compact antenna deliver operational performance, with reduced size, weight and power (SWaP) allowing ESPA-class spacecraft hosting.

The antenna’s single 23 cm diameter reflector accommodates all operational bands and necessary resolutions up to the priority 832 km, high inclination orbits. A low loss polarizer splits the incident signals to two wideband feed horns attached to low noise and SWaP RF front end electronics (RFE).

Atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding is performed in 22 channels over 6 frequency bands ranging from 24 to 183 GHz, using channels in the 50 to 58 GHz range (V-band) for temperature sounding. K, Ka and W-band receivers are direct-detection designs while the V, D and G-band receivers are super heterodyne designs.

Channels near the most sensitive V-band oxygen resonance ensure temperature measurements accurately sound to the Earth’s surface under the most demanding weather conditions. Use of digital receiver (DR) technology for V-band channels is reconfigurable to meet changing operational needs, even while on-orbit.

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Aug 1st, 12:00 AM

BOWIE-M: A Microwave Sounder for Next Generation Operational Weather

Utah State University, Logan, UT

The Ball Operational Weather Instrument Evolution-Microwave (BOWIE-M) is a compact cross-track scanning microwave radiometer combining design heritage from several radiometers as well as from IR&D efforts. Miniaturized RF electronics, a digital receiver and a compact antenna deliver operational performance, with reduced size, weight and power (SWaP) allowing ESPA-class spacecraft hosting.

The antenna’s single 23 cm diameter reflector accommodates all operational bands and necessary resolutions up to the priority 832 km, high inclination orbits. A low loss polarizer splits the incident signals to two wideband feed horns attached to low noise and SWaP RF front end electronics (RFE).

Atmospheric temperature and humidity sounding is performed in 22 channels over 6 frequency bands ranging from 24 to 183 GHz, using channels in the 50 to 58 GHz range (V-band) for temperature sounding. K, Ka and W-band receivers are direct-detection designs while the V, D and G-band receivers are super heterodyne designs.

Channels near the most sensitive V-band oxygen resonance ensure temperature measurements accurately sound to the Earth’s surface under the most demanding weather conditions. Use of digital receiver (DR) technology for V-band channels is reconfigurable to meet changing operational needs, even while on-orbit.