Session

Technical Session 2: Next on the Pad

Location

Utah State University, Logan, UT

Abstract

The MethaneSAT mission is expected to launch in Q4 of 2022 with a primary goal of providing systematic monitoring of methane emissions from regions accounting for more than 80% of global oil and gas production. High precision measurements from the sensor will allow quantification and mapping of essentially all methane emissions from these regions and identify the location of major point sources and quantify those methane emissions. MethaneSAT has a wide observing swath (~200km), high spatial resolution (~100m x400m), low detection threshold (~2pbb @ 1.5 km2), and targeting capability up to 40° off nadir, enabling it to fill a critical data and observing gap in obtaining quantitative measurements of methane emissions that can be detected by current and planned satellites that either focus on point sources or map the globe. MethaneSAT data will be publicly available and will provide companies, countries and the civil society at-large, the capability to quantify total methane emissions over time and map where they occur, resulting in improved capacity to manage, and reduce those emissions. The science and policy objectives were used to derive the mission architecture that consists of a single space craft in a sun-synchronous low-Earth orbit with agility to meet the frequent site revisit requirements through off-nadir pointing. MethaneSAT consists of two spectrometers, one covering 1249 – 1305nm wavelengths for Oxygen detection and one covering 1605 –1683 nm wavelengths for Methane and Carbon Dioxide retrievals, with 0.1 nm spectral sampling and 0.3 nm spectral resolution. MethaneSAT strongly leverages Ball Aerospace’s heritage designs and spectrometer technologies developed for Landsat, Ozone Mapping & Profiler Suite (OMPS), and the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring Pollution (TEMPO)/Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) instruments, with new designs developed a s necessary to meet mission needs. MethaneSAT is packaged into a SmallSat and will launch as a secondary payload on a Falcon 9 rocket.

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Aug 9th, 11:30 AM

The MethaneSAT Mission

Utah State University, Logan, UT

The MethaneSAT mission is expected to launch in Q4 of 2022 with a primary goal of providing systematic monitoring of methane emissions from regions accounting for more than 80% of global oil and gas production. High precision measurements from the sensor will allow quantification and mapping of essentially all methane emissions from these regions and identify the location of major point sources and quantify those methane emissions. MethaneSAT has a wide observing swath (~200km), high spatial resolution (~100m x400m), low detection threshold (~2pbb @ 1.5 km2), and targeting capability up to 40° off nadir, enabling it to fill a critical data and observing gap in obtaining quantitative measurements of methane emissions that can be detected by current and planned satellites that either focus on point sources or map the globe. MethaneSAT data will be publicly available and will provide companies, countries and the civil society at-large, the capability to quantify total methane emissions over time and map where they occur, resulting in improved capacity to manage, and reduce those emissions. The science and policy objectives were used to derive the mission architecture that consists of a single space craft in a sun-synchronous low-Earth orbit with agility to meet the frequent site revisit requirements through off-nadir pointing. MethaneSAT consists of two spectrometers, one covering 1249 – 1305nm wavelengths for Oxygen detection and one covering 1605 –1683 nm wavelengths for Methane and Carbon Dioxide retrievals, with 0.1 nm spectral sampling and 0.3 nm spectral resolution. MethaneSAT strongly leverages Ball Aerospace’s heritage designs and spectrometer technologies developed for Landsat, Ozone Mapping & Profiler Suite (OMPS), and the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring Pollution (TEMPO)/Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) instruments, with new designs developed a s necessary to meet mission needs. MethaneSAT is packaged into a SmallSat and will launch as a secondary payload on a Falcon 9 rocket.