Title

Systematic Instruction of Assistive Technology for Cognition (ATC) in a Vocational Setting Following Acquired Brain Injury: A Single Case, Experimental Study

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Neuro Rehabilitation

Volume

37

Issue

3

Publisher

PubMed

Publication Date

1-1-2015

First Page

437

Last Page

447

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Assistive technology for cognition (ATC) can be an effective means of compensating for cognitive impairments following acquired brain injury. Systematic instruction is an evidence-based approach to training a variety of skills and strategies, including the use of ATC. OBJECTIVE: This study experimentally evaluated systematic instruction applied to assistive technology for cognition (ATC) in a vocational setting. METHODS: The study used a single-case, multiple-probe design across behaviors design. The participant was a 50-year old female with cognitive impairments following an acquired brain injury (ABI). As a part-time employee, she was systematically instructed on how to operate and routinely use selected applications (apps) on her iPod Touch to support three work-related skills: (a) recording/recalling the details of work assignments, (b) recording/recalling work-related meetings and conversations, and (c) recording/performing multi-step technology tasks. The experimental intervention was systematic instruction applied to ATC. The dependent measures were: (a) the use of ATC at work as measured by an ATC routine task analysis; and (b) recall of work-related tasks and information. RESULTS: Treatment effects were replicated across the three work-related skills and were maintained up to one year following the completion of intensive training across behaviors with periodic review (booster sessions). CONCLUSIONS: Systematic instruction is a critical component to teaching the routine use of ATC to compensate for cognitive impairments following ABI.

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