Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Volume

29

Publisher

The Wildlife Society

Publication Date

2001

First Page

974

Last Page

978

Abstract

Bat detectors are an important tool for ecological studies of bats. However, the quality and quantity of data may be affected by the recording devices used to record the output from the detector. We compared recordings of bat activity from audiocassette recorders and computers. Numbers of calls/hour, passes/hour, identifiable passes/hour, and feeding buzzes/hour were similar (all P’s > 0.1) between recording devices. All call characteristics, except for the minimum frequency and characteristic frequency, differed (P < 0.05) between tapes and computers. Species identification with discriminate function analysis was less reliable with tape data than with computer data, particularly when the model built with computer-recorded reference calls was tested with tape-recorded calls. Therefore, we suggest when tape recorders are used for field recording that they also are used to record reference calls.

Comments

Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society.

Publisher version below:

http://www.jstor.org/stable/3784425