Event Title

Making Service-Learning Work for You

Location

LaSells Stewart Center

Event Website

http://uenr.forestry.oregonstate.edu/

Start Date

14-3-2008 1:30 PM

End Date

14-3-2008 3:30 PM

Description

Consensus emerges about defining characteristics and transformative potential of service-learning. The challenge is to design effective service-learning experiences that nurture connections at the intersections of learning and service goals, disciplines, and institutional units. Individuals can attend any or all parts of this workshop; discussion will occur during each part. Part 1 (30 min): Overview of the pedagogy, its non-traditional nature, benefits, and challenges. Service-learning integrates learning and service goals; academic and civic learning; collaboration between campus and community; and structured reflection. Community partnerships and critical reflection are key elements of intentional design for maximum impact. Part 2 (60 minutes): Examples of service-learning in natural resources courses at NC State, from single-class activities to multi-course sequences. (1) We integrated service-learning into a three-course forest measurement sequence. A “one-shot” service-learning activity acclimates students to the approach during the first course; they advance to a semester-long service-learning project in the third course. (2) Natural Resources Measurements is built around a service-learning project. Students have worked with county government to estimate local trends in impervious surface levels, providing data used in drafting new storm water regulations. (3) We are assessing the ecological value of Raleigh’s forests with several partners during a three-semester process in which data and information are passed from one course to the next. Part 3 (90 minutes): Clinic to help faculty see how to incorporate service-learning effectively into their courses and curricula. Working in small, facilitated groups, participants will engage in focused discussion of service-learning possibilities for their courses. We will offer an instructional design process and support participants in applying it collaboratively to their situations. Participants will leave with concrete ideas and a list of resources. The session will be relevant to instructors new to and experienced with service-learning.

Comments

Session #2: Experiential and Service Learning. Presentation for 7th Biennial Conference on University Education in Natural Resources, March 13-15, 2008, Corvallis, Oregon. Featured in the ScholarsArchive@OSU in Oregon State University. Suggested Citation: Hess, George et al. 2008. Making service-learning work for you. UENR 7th Biennial Conference, ScholarsArchive at Oregon State University. http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/handle/1957/8332

 
Mar 14th, 1:30 PM Mar 14th, 3:30 PM

Making Service-Learning Work for You

LaSells Stewart Center

Consensus emerges about defining characteristics and transformative potential of service-learning. The challenge is to design effective service-learning experiences that nurture connections at the intersections of learning and service goals, disciplines, and institutional units. Individuals can attend any or all parts of this workshop; discussion will occur during each part. Part 1 (30 min): Overview of the pedagogy, its non-traditional nature, benefits, and challenges. Service-learning integrates learning and service goals; academic and civic learning; collaboration between campus and community; and structured reflection. Community partnerships and critical reflection are key elements of intentional design for maximum impact. Part 2 (60 minutes): Examples of service-learning in natural resources courses at NC State, from single-class activities to multi-course sequences. (1) We integrated service-learning into a three-course forest measurement sequence. A “one-shot” service-learning activity acclimates students to the approach during the first course; they advance to a semester-long service-learning project in the third course. (2) Natural Resources Measurements is built around a service-learning project. Students have worked with county government to estimate local trends in impervious surface levels, providing data used in drafting new storm water regulations. (3) We are assessing the ecological value of Raleigh’s forests with several partners during a three-semester process in which data and information are passed from one course to the next. Part 3 (90 minutes): Clinic to help faculty see how to incorporate service-learning effectively into their courses and curricula. Working in small, facilitated groups, participants will engage in focused discussion of service-learning possibilities for their courses. We will offer an instructional design process and support participants in applying it collaboratively to their situations. Participants will leave with concrete ideas and a list of resources. The session will be relevant to instructors new to and experienced with service-learning.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/7thBiennial/Sessions/49