Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Applied Turfgrass Science

Volume

11

Issue

1

Publication Date

2014

DOI

DOI 10.2134/ATS-2014-0018-BR

Abstract

A goal of low-input turfgrass is to reduce mowing, thereby reducing labor, fuel, and equipment expenses. A way to meet this goal is to develop grasses that grow slower. 'Bella' Kentucky bluegrass was released by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as a slow-growing variety of bluegrass. This experiment documents slightly to significantly slower growth of 'Bella' compared to a traditional Kentucky bluegrass sod blend and tall fescue grown in the Intermountain West region of North America. Consumers frequently seek grasses that need less mowing and fertilizer (Busey and Parker, 1992). Although turfgrasses recover from traffic by growing, many uses don't need fast growth due to minimal traffic. With this in mind, 'Bella' Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) was released by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as a slower growing variety compared to other bluegrasses (Shearman, 2010). This study was conducted to further test if Bella bluegrass grows slower than a standard blend of bluegrass and a tall fescue variety at two mowing heights and three fertilization rates in northern Utah.

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