Date of Award:

1998

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Lani Van Dusen

Abstract

Research on analogical problem solving has delineated several factors that impact one's ability to spontaneously generate a correct solution strategy to a target problem. These factors include, but are not limited to, type of analogy provided to subjects (i.e., partial versus complete), the level of analogical problem-solving expertise, and the absence of or type of analogical problem-solving training (i.e., teacher-generated or learner-generated) provided to learners.

Recently, researchers have begun to focus on providing solvers with multiple practice opportunities and extending these opportunities over a systematically distributed period of time. When combined with analogical problem-solving training, these factors will augment the learner's ability to spontaneously generate a correct solution strategy to both complete and partial target problems.

Using an experimental design, the present study examined the differential effects of type of analogue (partial versus complete), type of training (teacher-generated, learner-generated, or no training), and length of training (condensed versus extended) on novice learners' ability to spontaneously generate correct solution strategies to two target problems.

Findings indicate that, on the complete target problem, regardless of training group membership, no effect over control group participants was found. Partial target problem results indicate a slight advantage for participating in the learner-generated extended training group over no training. Also on the partial target problem, a moderate advantage was found for participating in the learner-generated extended training group over the condensed training.

Limitations of the study, implications for educators, and recommendations for future studies are provided.

Checksum

54f873b4b6474856985b82f4d027fdef

Included in

Psychology Commons

Share

COinS