Event Title

The Impact of Cattle Grazing on Aspen Regeneration on Crown Lands in Western Manitoba

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

23-6-2009 1:30 PM

End Date

23-6-2009 1:50 PM

Description

In North America there has been an increasing appreciation for the value of trembling aspen as a source of timber (Populus tremuloides Michx). Moreover, aspen stands and the understory vegetation that they support also provide valuable forage for livestock and wildlife. Timber harvest and cattle grazing may occur on the same land base, although usually not simultaneously. The purpose of this study was to determine the affects of cattle grazing in post-harvest aspen stands in western Manitoba. In this study, grazed and non-grazed sites are compared to assess the effects of cattle grazing on stem density, tree health, and species diversity in the understory plant community across a seven-year chronosequence of harvests. Environmental data were collected to complement the biological data including soil compaction, soil texture, moisture regime and grazing pressure. Non-grazed sites in the oldest harvests had taller stems and significantly higher stem densities of aspen and all other tree species (p<0.1). Trees in grazed plots also exhibit poorer tree health characteristics than those in the non-grazed plots.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 23rd, 1:30 PM Jun 23rd, 1:50 PM

The Impact of Cattle Grazing on Aspen Regeneration on Crown Lands in Western Manitoba

In North America there has been an increasing appreciation for the value of trembling aspen as a source of timber (Populus tremuloides Michx). Moreover, aspen stands and the understory vegetation that they support also provide valuable forage for livestock and wildlife. Timber harvest and cattle grazing may occur on the same land base, although usually not simultaneously. The purpose of this study was to determine the affects of cattle grazing in post-harvest aspen stands in western Manitoba. In this study, grazed and non-grazed sites are compared to assess the effects of cattle grazing on stem density, tree health, and species diversity in the understory plant community across a seven-year chronosequence of harvests. Environmental data were collected to complement the biological data including soil compaction, soil texture, moisture regime and grazing pressure. Non-grazed sites in the oldest harvests had taller stems and significantly higher stem densities of aspen and all other tree species (p<0.1). Trees in grazed plots also exhibit poorer tree health characteristics than those in the non-grazed plots.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/aspen/2