Event Title

Adverse Influence of Radio Frequency Background on Aspen Seedlings and the Possible Relation to Increasing Atmospheric CO2

Presenter Information

K. Haggerty, Independent Research

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

23-6-2009 10:50 AM

End Date

23-6-2009 11:10 AM

Description

An experiment investigating possible effects of exposure to the ambient radio frequency (RF) background on aspen seedlings was conducted in rural Colorado at an altitude of 1,700 meters, on a north-facing slope in the Little Thompson River Valley. The location was 0.5 km distant from any RF source, including electrical power lines. In the spring 2007, three treatment enclosures were established: RF shielded (Faraday-caged), mock-shielded, and unshielded. Nine aspen seedlings in gallon pots were placed in each treatment enclosure. All factors: light level, humidity, airflow and temperature were monitored and maintained at equal levels between the shielded and mock-shielded environments. The un-caged seedlings were exposed to higher light level (full sun), had higher airflow, and generally lower humidity, since they were not in a screened enclosure. After two months, the RF-shielded group had produced 74% more active lead length and 60% more leaf area than the mock-shielded group, though both groups produced nearly the same number of leaves. Differences in growth and morphology between the mock-shielded and unshielded groups were slight. In early October 2007, the shielded group’s leaves turned a range of bright fall colors, and those leaves were substantially free of leaf fungus. At the same time, in the two exposed groups, leaves were green-yellow and a high percentage of leaf area was affected by leaf fungus. These results suggest that the manmade RF environment may be adversely affecting growth, dormancy, and resistance to fungus in aspen seedlings. Inhibition of growth in aspen caused by exposure to the RF background would limit their ability to take up CO2 and sequester carbon. This RF interaction with plants may, therefore, be indirectly contributing to the ongoing increase in atmospheric CO2.

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Jun 23rd, 10:50 AM Jun 23rd, 11:10 AM

Adverse Influence of Radio Frequency Background on Aspen Seedlings and the Possible Relation to Increasing Atmospheric CO2

An experiment investigating possible effects of exposure to the ambient radio frequency (RF) background on aspen seedlings was conducted in rural Colorado at an altitude of 1,700 meters, on a north-facing slope in the Little Thompson River Valley. The location was 0.5 km distant from any RF source, including electrical power lines. In the spring 2007, three treatment enclosures were established: RF shielded (Faraday-caged), mock-shielded, and unshielded. Nine aspen seedlings in gallon pots were placed in each treatment enclosure. All factors: light level, humidity, airflow and temperature were monitored and maintained at equal levels between the shielded and mock-shielded environments. The un-caged seedlings were exposed to higher light level (full sun), had higher airflow, and generally lower humidity, since they were not in a screened enclosure. After two months, the RF-shielded group had produced 74% more active lead length and 60% more leaf area than the mock-shielded group, though both groups produced nearly the same number of leaves. Differences in growth and morphology between the mock-shielded and unshielded groups were slight. In early October 2007, the shielded group’s leaves turned a range of bright fall colors, and those leaves were substantially free of leaf fungus. At the same time, in the two exposed groups, leaves were green-yellow and a high percentage of leaf area was affected by leaf fungus. These results suggest that the manmade RF environment may be adversely affecting growth, dormancy, and resistance to fungus in aspen seedlings. Inhibition of growth in aspen caused by exposure to the RF background would limit their ability to take up CO2 and sequester carbon. This RF interaction with plants may, therefore, be indirectly contributing to the ongoing increase in atmospheric CO2.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/aspen/6