Event Title

Development of Young Lodgepole Pine Leading Stands After Mountain Pine Beetle Attack in the Central BC Interior

Event Website

http://www.nafew2009.org/

Start Date

24-6-2009 11:10 AM

End Date

24-6-2009 11:30 AM

Description

The central interior of British Columbia, Canada is experiencing its largest recorded outbreak of mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins). Historically MPB only attacked larger (dbh >15cm), mature lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex loud. var. latifolia Engelm.). However during this outbreak, MPB have attacked trees as young as 15 with dbh ~7.5 cm. Attack in 21 - 40 year old stands has averaged 60% but has been highly variable: ranging from 0 to 95%. Given the success of MPB in young pine stands, their stand dynamics and management will affect future forest composition and structure as well as timber supply. Our objectives were to document species composition, stocking of seedlings, saplings, poles (secondary structure), and level of MPB attack in young pine leading stands and to project their short (40 years) and long term (80 years) growth with and without management intervention in SORTIE-ND. Attack levels below 60% resulted in a small short term productivity losses (< 10%) and no long term loss. When attack rates exceeded 80%, short term productivity losses were between 20 - 35% and dependent on species composition and amount of secondary stand structure. Long term yields were reduced by less than 15%. The species composition of the future stand was a function of attack and species composition of secondary structure. The under planting of attacked stands had little impact on future productivity or species composition. Renewing attacked stands resulted in less productivity than observed in unmanaged stands for the time frames examined. MPB attack in young stands does result in short term yield loss when attack rates exceed 60%; shifts in species composition depending on the makeup of the secondary structure; and small losses in long term productivity. It appears the best management action may be to allow young pine stands to develop without intervention.

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Jun 24th, 11:10 AM Jun 24th, 11:30 AM

Development of Young Lodgepole Pine Leading Stands After Mountain Pine Beetle Attack in the Central BC Interior

The central interior of British Columbia, Canada is experiencing its largest recorded outbreak of mountain pine beetle (MPB) (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins). Historically MPB only attacked larger (dbh >15cm), mature lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex loud. var. latifolia Engelm.). However during this outbreak, MPB have attacked trees as young as 15 with dbh ~7.5 cm. Attack in 21 - 40 year old stands has averaged 60% but has been highly variable: ranging from 0 to 95%. Given the success of MPB in young pine stands, their stand dynamics and management will affect future forest composition and structure as well as timber supply. Our objectives were to document species composition, stocking of seedlings, saplings, poles (secondary structure), and level of MPB attack in young pine leading stands and to project their short (40 years) and long term (80 years) growth with and without management intervention in SORTIE-ND. Attack levels below 60% resulted in a small short term productivity losses (< 10%) and no long term loss. When attack rates exceeded 80%, short term productivity losses were between 20 - 35% and dependent on species composition and amount of secondary stand structure. Long term yields were reduced by less than 15%. The species composition of the future stand was a function of attack and species composition of secondary structure. The under planting of attacked stands had little impact on future productivity or species composition. Renewing attacked stands resulted in less productivity than observed in unmanaged stands for the time frames examined. MPB attack in young stands does result in short term yield loss when attack rates exceed 60%; shifts in species composition depending on the makeup of the secondary structure; and small losses in long term productivity. It appears the best management action may be to allow young pine stands to develop without intervention.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nafecology/sessions/disease/2