Title

Coppice growth and water relations of silver maple

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

Biomass and Bioenergy

Volume

5

Issue

5

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Date

9-1-1993

First Page

317

Last Page

323

DOI

10.1016/0961-9534(93)90011-R

Abstract

Trees of silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.) planted in southern Illinois were cut at rootstock ages 2, 3, and/or 4 years. In all plantings a single main stem was the predominant growth form prior to initial harvest. The predominant post-harvest growth form was numerous coppice stems. The number of coppice stems per tree and percent tree survival decreased with greater stand density. Coppice growth, as measured by the number of stems and the height of the tallest stem, increased progressively with the number of harvest cycles. This growth was supported by a progressively older root system, and developed from an increasing number of cut stem bases. About 60% of the coppice were tall stems, over one-half the height of the tallest stem. Trees of the southernmost origin, from Mississippi, with high establishment rates had the highest dry weight production of two-year provenance coppice growth (equivalent to 59.5 Mg · ha−1 · 2 year−1, or 13.2 ton · acre−1 · year−1). The northernmost trees, from central Ontario, had low establishment rates and the lowest stand biomass. Dormant season macronutrient cropping losses were estimated related to biomass yield. Foliage density and stem elongation were greater in first-year coppiced compared to uncoppiced trees. Water relations of coppice growth differed from that of uncoppiced trees in both the first and the second year after harvest.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS