Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Dairy Wastewater Remediation Using Algal Biofilm

Presenter Information

Zachary FicaFollow

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2017

College

College of Engineering

Department

Biological Engineering Department

Faculty Mentor

Ron Sims

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Biofilm-based microalgal growth was determined as functions of organic chemical loading and water temperature utilizing dairy wastewater from a full-scale dairy farm. The dairy industry is a significant source of wastewater worldwide that could provide an inexpensive and nutrient rich feedstock for the cultivation of algae biomass for use in downstream processing of animal feed and aquaculture applications.

Algal biomass was cultivated using a Rotating Algal Biofilm Reactor (RABR) system. The RABR is a biofilm-based technology that has been designed and used to remediate municipal wastewater, and was applied to treat dairy wastewater, through nutrient uptake, and simultaneously provide biomass for the production of renewable bioproducts.

Algal biomass in the RABR system was grown at temperatures ranging from 7-27 °C, and organic carbon concentrations ranging from 300-1200 mg/L of Total Organic Carbon (TOC). Aerial algal biofilm growth rates at 7°C and 27°C temperatures were shown to be 4.55±0.17g/m2-day and 7.57±1.12 g/m2-day ash free dry weight (AFDW), respectively. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) calculations indicated that both the temperature of the wastewater and the level of organic carbon contributed significantly to the rate of biomass growth in the system. However, ANOVA results indicated that the interaction of temperature and organic carbon content was not significant related to the biofilm-based growth rate.

Location

Room 208

Start Date

13-4-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

13-4-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 13th, 10:30 AM Apr 13th, 11:45 AM

Dairy Wastewater Remediation Using Algal Biofilm

Room 208

Biofilm-based microalgal growth was determined as functions of organic chemical loading and water temperature utilizing dairy wastewater from a full-scale dairy farm. The dairy industry is a significant source of wastewater worldwide that could provide an inexpensive and nutrient rich feedstock for the cultivation of algae biomass for use in downstream processing of animal feed and aquaculture applications.

Algal biomass was cultivated using a Rotating Algal Biofilm Reactor (RABR) system. The RABR is a biofilm-based technology that has been designed and used to remediate municipal wastewater, and was applied to treat dairy wastewater, through nutrient uptake, and simultaneously provide biomass for the production of renewable bioproducts.

Algal biomass in the RABR system was grown at temperatures ranging from 7-27 °C, and organic carbon concentrations ranging from 300-1200 mg/L of Total Organic Carbon (TOC). Aerial algal biofilm growth rates at 7°C and 27°C temperatures were shown to be 4.55±0.17g/m2-day and 7.57±1.12 g/m2-day ash free dry weight (AFDW), respectively. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) calculations indicated that both the temperature of the wastewater and the level of organic carbon contributed significantly to the rate of biomass growth in the system. However, ANOVA results indicated that the interaction of temperature and organic carbon content was not significant related to the biofilm-based growth rate.