Title of Oral/Poster Presentation

Harvest and Disposal of Hazardous Algal Blooms

Class

Article

Graduation Year

2018

College

College of Engineering

Department

Biological Engineering Department

Faculty Mentor

Ronald Sims

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

Utah Lake, a major source of recreation and farmland irrigation in the Provo area, was closed to all use and access in the summer of 2016. There was a toxic blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) outbreak, which resulted in microcystin concentrations over eight times the recreational water threshold limit (20 ug/L threshold and 176 ug/L detection). The ability to harvest and dispose of these toxic algae before contamination of the lake occurs is important to ensure protection of human and animal health and the environment, and more hazardous algae blooms (HABs) are anticipated in the future.

The Central Valley Water Reclamation Facility (CVWRF), a local municipal wastewater treatment facility, utilizes anaerobic digesters for wastewater treatment. A preliminary experiment was conducted to test cyanobacteria microcystin degradation via anaerobic digestion using anaerobic digester sludge obtained from this facility. The microcystin concentration readings were conducted using ABRAXIS Recreational Water Microcystin Dipstick ELISA Test and AbraScan II Dipstick Reader.

Preliminary experimentation shows a trend of microcystin degradation over time in laboratory-scale anaerobic digesters. Microcystin concentration decreased from approximately 10 ug/L to approximately 2.5 ug/L, a 75% reduction, in diluted samples through the thirty-six-day treatment test. Average microcystin concentration was plotted vs time, resulting in a first-order decay constant of 0.03/day. Based on this trend, an estimated 75% reduction in microcystin can occur within approximately forty-six days. The change in microcystin concentration was approximately zero in control groups consisting of microcystin in distilled deionized water. Further testing is needed, but this data indicates a possibility of harvesting HABs from Utah Lake for disposal in the CVWRF digesters.

With a method for disposal in place, a response plan for removing toxic algae and protecting important river and irrigation inlets will be developed for implementation in response to hazardous algal blooms at Utah Lake.

Location

North Atrium

Start Date

13-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

13-4-2017 2:45 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 13th, 1:30 PM Apr 13th, 2:45 PM

Harvest and Disposal of Hazardous Algal Blooms

North Atrium

Utah Lake, a major source of recreation and farmland irrigation in the Provo area, was closed to all use and access in the summer of 2016. There was a toxic blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) outbreak, which resulted in microcystin concentrations over eight times the recreational water threshold limit (20 ug/L threshold and 176 ug/L detection). The ability to harvest and dispose of these toxic algae before contamination of the lake occurs is important to ensure protection of human and animal health and the environment, and more hazardous algae blooms (HABs) are anticipated in the future.

The Central Valley Water Reclamation Facility (CVWRF), a local municipal wastewater treatment facility, utilizes anaerobic digesters for wastewater treatment. A preliminary experiment was conducted to test cyanobacteria microcystin degradation via anaerobic digestion using anaerobic digester sludge obtained from this facility. The microcystin concentration readings were conducted using ABRAXIS Recreational Water Microcystin Dipstick ELISA Test and AbraScan II Dipstick Reader.

Preliminary experimentation shows a trend of microcystin degradation over time in laboratory-scale anaerobic digesters. Microcystin concentration decreased from approximately 10 ug/L to approximately 2.5 ug/L, a 75% reduction, in diluted samples through the thirty-six-day treatment test. Average microcystin concentration was plotted vs time, resulting in a first-order decay constant of 0.03/day. Based on this trend, an estimated 75% reduction in microcystin can occur within approximately forty-six days. The change in microcystin concentration was approximately zero in control groups consisting of microcystin in distilled deionized water. Further testing is needed, but this data indicates a possibility of harvesting HABs from Utah Lake for disposal in the CVWRF digesters.

With a method for disposal in place, a response plan for removing toxic algae and protecting important river and irrigation inlets will be developed for implementation in response to hazardous algal blooms at Utah Lake.