Location

Logan, UT

Event Website

http://restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic biofuels is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35–50% of the total fuel production cost, depending on geographical factors and equipment selection for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that influence near-term biorefinery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial model-based supply scenarios postulate a dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this near-term design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply improvements, and technology advancements to achieve long-term cost targets. Near-term supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefineries using specific feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. However, as the industry develops, cost barriers are addressed, and risks associated with large scale biomass utilization are considered, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefineries located in different regions. This advanced supply system will utilize current handling infrastructure to move a quality controlled, desified, and stable cellulosic feedstocks to biorefineries as a commodity material similar to current grain and emerging wood commodities.

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Oct 18th, 12:00 AM

New Developments in the World of Biomass Utilization

Logan, UT

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic biofuels is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35–50% of the total fuel production cost, depending on geographical factors and equipment selection for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that influence near-term biorefinery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial model-based supply scenarios postulate a dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this near-term design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply improvements, and technology advancements to achieve long-term cost targets. Near-term supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefineries using specific feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. However, as the industry develops, cost barriers are addressed, and risks associated with large scale biomass utilization are considered, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefineries located in different regions. This advanced supply system will utilize current handling infrastructure to move a quality controlled, desified, and stable cellulosic feedstocks to biorefineries as a commodity material similar to current grain and emerging wood commodities.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2011/Breakout2/4