Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://www.restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

This presentation will focus on a large working western landscape, the High Lonesome Ranch, DeBeque, CO, and how to better develop public and private relationships that foster planned landscape scale mineral development and other compatible land use practices while continually focusing on good science and conservation practices. It will describe motivations and vision for the High Lonesome Ranch providing insight about an extraordinary effort in conservation today. Paul R. Vahldiek Jr., Chairman of the Board, President and CEO of The High Lonesome Ranch, P.O. Box 88, De Beque, CO, 81630, paul@pvtxlaw.com

Paul R. Vahldiek, Jr. is Chairman, of The High Lonesome Ranch (HLR) and President of Deep Water Cay (DWC). He received his undergraduate degree from Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas in 1977 and a J.D. from St. Mary’s University School of Law, San Antonio, Texas in 1979. He began practicing law in 1980 and in 2008 received the Distinguished Graduate Award from the St. Mary’s University School of Law. The High Lonesome Ranch comprises approximately 300 square miles of deeded and permitted public lands (BLM), located northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The ranch includes lands ranging from approximately 5,000 to 9,200 feet in elevation that have been in agricultural and ranching uses since the mid 1800’s. The High Lonesome Ranch’s vision is committed to ensuring its lands, waters, and resources are healthy and productive for compatible values and uses, demonstrating how private and public lands can be stewarded in perpetuity for ethical uses and economic vitality. This effort will further and model a land ethic. In addition, Mr. Vahldiek and HLR are actively supporting the development of the High Lonesome Institute (HLI) that is being established to: advance scientific and scholarly knowledge relevant to stewardship of resources on working landscapes in the Intermountain West. It accomplishes these purposes through intentional science, education, and outreach focused (1) on improving land and resource management decisions, and (2) on being a venue for dialogue among diverse groups seeking to find common ground on conservation and sustainable development.

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Oct 31st, 9:20 AM Oct 31st, 10:00 AM

High Lonesome Ranch – a Compatible Use Private Landscape with Conservation and Biodiversity Based Goals and its Interactions with Public Lands

USU Eccles Conference Center

This presentation will focus on a large working western landscape, the High Lonesome Ranch, DeBeque, CO, and how to better develop public and private relationships that foster planned landscape scale mineral development and other compatible land use practices while continually focusing on good science and conservation practices. It will describe motivations and vision for the High Lonesome Ranch providing insight about an extraordinary effort in conservation today. Paul R. Vahldiek Jr., Chairman of the Board, President and CEO of The High Lonesome Ranch, P.O. Box 88, De Beque, CO, 81630, paul@pvtxlaw.com

Paul R. Vahldiek, Jr. is Chairman, of The High Lonesome Ranch (HLR) and President of Deep Water Cay (DWC). He received his undergraduate degree from Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas in 1977 and a J.D. from St. Mary’s University School of Law, San Antonio, Texas in 1979. He began practicing law in 1980 and in 2008 received the Distinguished Graduate Award from the St. Mary’s University School of Law. The High Lonesome Ranch comprises approximately 300 square miles of deeded and permitted public lands (BLM), located northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The ranch includes lands ranging from approximately 5,000 to 9,200 feet in elevation that have been in agricultural and ranching uses since the mid 1800’s. The High Lonesome Ranch’s vision is committed to ensuring its lands, waters, and resources are healthy and productive for compatible values and uses, demonstrating how private and public lands can be stewarded in perpetuity for ethical uses and economic vitality. This effort will further and model a land ethic. In addition, Mr. Vahldiek and HLR are actively supporting the development of the High Lonesome Institute (HLI) that is being established to: advance scientific and scholarly knowledge relevant to stewardship of resources on working landscapes in the Intermountain West. It accomplishes these purposes through intentional science, education, and outreach focused (1) on improving land and resource management decisions, and (2) on being a venue for dialogue among diverse groups seeking to find common ground on conservation and sustainable development.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2012/october31/2