Location

USU Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://www.restoringthewest.org/

Streaming Media

Abstract

Natural gas and oil production in the Piceance Basin has rapidly increased over the last two decades. Concerns over the impact this development may have on the Piceance biota have intensified, specifically regarding effects on the rare plant community and their respective pollinators. We investigated the potential effects of dispersed development on two rare mustards, Physaria congesta and Physaria obcordata. Both species of Physaria

are listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and require pollination services for adequate reproduction. Development may potentially change the pollinator community important to these rare plants through habitat fragmentation and suitable habitat declination. These changes could include modification in diversity, abundance, or pollinator functional type. These changes in pollinator community may impact rare plant pollination, which would influence fecundity rates. During the spring of 2010 and 2011, plant fecundity was monitored at selected distances from road sides. For these experiments, roads were considered the major type of development. Differences in plant fecundity were analyzed for multiple covariance parameters to determine if there was any significant effect due to the development. Analysis determined that the effects of development on rare plant fecundity were minimal.

Sarah Clark, Utah State University Department of Biology, 5305 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322, scoot.c@aggiemail.usu.edu

Sarah Clark is a Masters student in the Biology Department at Utah State University. She has always been interested in entomology and natural sciences, with recent emphasis in pollination biology and ecology. She received her BS in Biology at Utah State University, and decided to stay on for a MS under the tutelage of Dr. James P. Pitts in the terrestrial entomology lab. Her research followed her interests, where she studied plant- pollinator networks on rare plants in Colorado. She enjoys kayaking, running, small dog agility, and knitting outfits for her four legged friends.

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Oct 31st, 1:00 PM Oct 31st, 1:10 PM

The Effect of Energy Development on Rare Plant Fecundity in the Piceance Basin, Colorado

USU Eccles Conference Center

Natural gas and oil production in the Piceance Basin has rapidly increased over the last two decades. Concerns over the impact this development may have on the Piceance biota have intensified, specifically regarding effects on the rare plant community and their respective pollinators. We investigated the potential effects of dispersed development on two rare mustards, Physaria congesta and Physaria obcordata. Both species of Physaria

are listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and require pollination services for adequate reproduction. Development may potentially change the pollinator community important to these rare plants through habitat fragmentation and suitable habitat declination. These changes could include modification in diversity, abundance, or pollinator functional type. These changes in pollinator community may impact rare plant pollination, which would influence fecundity rates. During the spring of 2010 and 2011, plant fecundity was monitored at selected distances from road sides. For these experiments, roads were considered the major type of development. Differences in plant fecundity were analyzed for multiple covariance parameters to determine if there was any significant effect due to the development. Analysis determined that the effects of development on rare plant fecundity were minimal.

Sarah Clark, Utah State University Department of Biology, 5305 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322, scoot.c@aggiemail.usu.edu

Sarah Clark is a Masters student in the Biology Department at Utah State University. She has always been interested in entomology and natural sciences, with recent emphasis in pollination biology and ecology. She received her BS in Biology at Utah State University, and decided to stay on for a MS under the tutelage of Dr. James P. Pitts in the terrestrial entomology lab. Her research followed her interests, where she studied plant- pollinator networks on rare plants in Colorado. She enjoys kayaking, running, small dog agility, and knitting outfits for her four legged friends.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/rtw/2012/october31/6