Event Title

Estimating changes in snow water equivalent (SWE) using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)

Presenter Information

Elias J. Deeb

Location

ECC 303/305

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

5-4-2007 11:50 AM

End Date

5-4-2007 12:10 PM

Description

Snow water equivalent (SWE) is a measurement of how much water a given snowpack would yield if it was melted. In geographic locations where water supply is directly linked to snowpack, this parameter is a key element when addressing water resource management. Meteorological stations located throughout a basin do collect point samples of SWE to assist in modeling this phenomenon. However, due to the high variability of snow cover in both time and space, these point sample measurements do not adequately characterize SWE across an entire basin. Remote sensing applications have been developed to address the inadequate spatial distribution of SWE data currently available. In particular, radar remote sensing and interferometery have a unique ability to differentiate between different snowpack conditions (wetness, surface roughness, ice layers, grain size, etc.). Previous research has shown a relationship between interferometric phase of a radar signal and changes in snow water equivalent (SWE) for dry snow. Promising results in the Kuparuk watershed, North Slope, Alaska have deemed the need for additional research sites in the Western United States where (1) the repeat interval of a satellite brackets a precipitation event and (2) meteorological stations (e.g. SNOTEL sites) measuring SWE exist throughout the study area.

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Apr 5th, 11:50 AM Apr 5th, 12:10 PM

Estimating changes in snow water equivalent (SWE) using interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR)

ECC 303/305

Snow water equivalent (SWE) is a measurement of how much water a given snowpack would yield if it was melted. In geographic locations where water supply is directly linked to snowpack, this parameter is a key element when addressing water resource management. Meteorological stations located throughout a basin do collect point samples of SWE to assist in modeling this phenomenon. However, due to the high variability of snow cover in both time and space, these point sample measurements do not adequately characterize SWE across an entire basin. Remote sensing applications have been developed to address the inadequate spatial distribution of SWE data currently available. In particular, radar remote sensing and interferometery have a unique ability to differentiate between different snowpack conditions (wetness, surface roughness, ice layers, grain size, etc.). Previous research has shown a relationship between interferometric phase of a radar signal and changes in snow water equivalent (SWE) for dry snow. Promising results in the Kuparuk watershed, North Slope, Alaska have deemed the need for additional research sites in the Western United States where (1) the repeat interval of a satellite brackets a precipitation event and (2) meteorological stations (e.g. SNOTEL sites) measuring SWE exist throughout the study area.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllAbstracts/11