Event Title

Identification of recharge sources to springs in southeastern Cache Valley, Utah, based on discharge and chemistry

Presenter Information

Thomas Lachmar

Location

ECC 203

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

5-4-2007 3:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2007 3:50 PM

Description

The discharges of 43 springs in southeastern Cache Valley were measured monthly from May or June of 2005 through March of 2006. Water samples from 36 of these springs plus an additional 10 were analyzed for major ions and trace metals. Twenty-one of the springs were analyzed for deuterium and oxygen-18 and 10 of these were analyzed for tritium. Six potential sources of recharge to the springs were identified: (1) shallow ground water, (2) deep ground water, (3) river water, (4) canal water, (5) excess irrigation water, and (6) precipitation. The springs were divided into groups based on when they had their peak discharges. Six springs had peak discharges in the spring, suggesting they are recharged by precipitation. Eleven had peak discharges in the summer months, suggesting they are recharged by canal and/or excess irrigation water. Another 13 had peak discharges during the winter, suggesting they are recharged by rivers and/or deep ground water. The last 13 springs had peak discharges during multiple seasons, suggesting they have multiple recharge sources. Spring water is characterized by calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate, similar to deep ground water and river water. However, of the 21 spring samples analyzed for deuterium and oxygen-18, ten are most similar to canal water, six are most similar to wells completed into the deep aquifer system, suggesting that both the springs and the wells are recharged by rivers, three are most similar to river water, one is most similar to precipitation, and the last one is more negative (heavier) than any sample in this or previously published studies. In addition, four springs have high chloride concentrations, most likely from road de-icer suggesting they are recharged at least in part by precipitation, three springs have high concentrations of silica, two of which are known to be bedrock springs, and five springs have high sulfate concentrations due to their proximity to the Blacksmith Fork River. Of the 53 springs that had their discharges monitored and/or for which water samples were collected and analyzed, 23 appear to be recharged primarily by rivers, 21 probably are recharged mainly by canal and/or excess irrigation water, five gain water from multiple sources, two are bedrock springs, and the most likely source(s) of recharge could not be determined for the last two. The implications of these results include: (1) increased pumping from the deep aquifer system should not directly affect spring discharges, (2) drought conditions would likely decrease the discharges of springs recharged primarily by rivers, and (3) changes in land use may alter spring discharges.

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Apr 5th, 3:30 PM Apr 5th, 3:50 PM

Identification of recharge sources to springs in southeastern Cache Valley, Utah, based on discharge and chemistry

ECC 203

The discharges of 43 springs in southeastern Cache Valley were measured monthly from May or June of 2005 through March of 2006. Water samples from 36 of these springs plus an additional 10 were analyzed for major ions and trace metals. Twenty-one of the springs were analyzed for deuterium and oxygen-18 and 10 of these were analyzed for tritium. Six potential sources of recharge to the springs were identified: (1) shallow ground water, (2) deep ground water, (3) river water, (4) canal water, (5) excess irrigation water, and (6) precipitation. The springs were divided into groups based on when they had their peak discharges. Six springs had peak discharges in the spring, suggesting they are recharged by precipitation. Eleven had peak discharges in the summer months, suggesting they are recharged by canal and/or excess irrigation water. Another 13 had peak discharges during the winter, suggesting they are recharged by rivers and/or deep ground water. The last 13 springs had peak discharges during multiple seasons, suggesting they have multiple recharge sources. Spring water is characterized by calcium, magnesium and bicarbonate, similar to deep ground water and river water. However, of the 21 spring samples analyzed for deuterium and oxygen-18, ten are most similar to canal water, six are most similar to wells completed into the deep aquifer system, suggesting that both the springs and the wells are recharged by rivers, three are most similar to river water, one is most similar to precipitation, and the last one is more negative (heavier) than any sample in this or previously published studies. In addition, four springs have high chloride concentrations, most likely from road de-icer suggesting they are recharged at least in part by precipitation, three springs have high concentrations of silica, two of which are known to be bedrock springs, and five springs have high sulfate concentrations due to their proximity to the Blacksmith Fork River. Of the 53 springs that had their discharges monitored and/or for which water samples were collected and analyzed, 23 appear to be recharged primarily by rivers, 21 probably are recharged mainly by canal and/or excess irrigation water, five gain water from multiple sources, two are bedrock springs, and the most likely source(s) of recharge could not be determined for the last two. The implications of these results include: (1) increased pumping from the deep aquifer system should not directly affect spring discharges, (2) drought conditions would likely decrease the discharges of springs recharged primarily by rivers, and (3) changes in land use may alter spring discharges.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2007/AllAbstracts/29