Event Title

Continuous Water Quality Monitoring: Assessing the Current Sediment and Nutrient Trapping Capabilities of Mud Lake

Presenter Information

Cody Allen

Location

Eccles Conference Center

Event Website

http://water.usu.edu/htm/conference/past-spring-runoff-conferences

Start Date

2-4-2009 8:35 AM

End Date

2-4-2009 8:40 AM

Description

Mud Lake is located between the Bear River and Bear Lake. Over the years it has acted as a natural sediment and nutrient sink for water passing into Bear Lake and for water returning to the Bear River. In more recent years channelization caused by sediment deposition may have reduced the filtration capacity of Mud Lake. The purpose of this project is to monitor the current filtration capacity of this system. Continuous turbidity samplers have been placed at the major inlets and outlets of the system, and periodic water quality samples are taken at those sites. The water quality samples will be correlated with turbidity measurements to analyze the strength of relationships. Using data from these relationships paired with discharge data, sediment and nutrient loads will be calculated at each site and an overall mass balance will be created for the system. This study will be helpful in providing managers information on how to best use Mud Lake as a sediment and nutrient sink throughout seasonality changes.

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Apr 2nd, 8:35 AM Apr 2nd, 8:40 AM

Continuous Water Quality Monitoring: Assessing the Current Sediment and Nutrient Trapping Capabilities of Mud Lake

Eccles Conference Center

Mud Lake is located between the Bear River and Bear Lake. Over the years it has acted as a natural sediment and nutrient sink for water passing into Bear Lake and for water returning to the Bear River. In more recent years channelization caused by sediment deposition may have reduced the filtration capacity of Mud Lake. The purpose of this project is to monitor the current filtration capacity of this system. Continuous turbidity samplers have been placed at the major inlets and outlets of the system, and periodic water quality samples are taken at those sites. The water quality samples will be correlated with turbidity measurements to analyze the strength of relationships. Using data from these relationships paired with discharge data, sediment and nutrient loads will be calculated at each site and an overall mass balance will be created for the system. This study will be helpful in providing managers information on how to best use Mud Lake as a sediment and nutrient sink throughout seasonality changes.

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/runoff/2009/AllPosters/30