Session

Technical Session IX: From Earth To Orbit

SSC10-IX-2.pdf (810 kB)
Presentation Slides

Abstract

United Launch Alliance (ULA) developed the Aft Bulkhead Carrier (ABC) system for mounting small satellites onto the Atlas V launch vehicle. Payloads with a maximum mass of 176 lbs and volume of 20 x 20 x 34 in. are viable candidates to fly. ULA has already built flight hardware and is preparing a User’s Guide to document the technical interface information required by spacecraft designers. When working with the rideshare community, primary payload mission managers expect the small satellite programs to meet high standards for requirements, management, and closeout during integration on their mission. Successful integration of small satellites onto the ABC takes place following a disciplined approach to meeting and verifying mission requirements. It is vital that the community comprehend what these requirements are and follow an established process to meet them. By doing so, access to orbit can be reliably achieved for small satellites via the ABC. Failed integration efforts cost time, money, and customer good will. This paper summarizes the ABC system and progress of the development to date. Additionally, it provides a summary of the ABC User’s Guide, identifying the generic requirements any payload must meet to successfully launch. Additional insight is presented as to the type of verifications needed, their expected quality, and timing during the integration schedule. A case study on the integration of the ADAMSAT payload is reviewed, providing a real-life example of lessons learned from the attempt to integrate this Cubesat Dispensing system to the ABC/ Atlas V.

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Aug 11th, 2:00 AM

The Atlas V Aft Bulkhead Carrier - Requirements for the Small Satellite Designer

United Launch Alliance (ULA) developed the Aft Bulkhead Carrier (ABC) system for mounting small satellites onto the Atlas V launch vehicle. Payloads with a maximum mass of 176 lbs and volume of 20 x 20 x 34 in. are viable candidates to fly. ULA has already built flight hardware and is preparing a User’s Guide to document the technical interface information required by spacecraft designers. When working with the rideshare community, primary payload mission managers expect the small satellite programs to meet high standards for requirements, management, and closeout during integration on their mission. Successful integration of small satellites onto the ABC takes place following a disciplined approach to meeting and verifying mission requirements. It is vital that the community comprehend what these requirements are and follow an established process to meet them. By doing so, access to orbit can be reliably achieved for small satellites via the ABC. Failed integration efforts cost time, money, and customer good will. This paper summarizes the ABC system and progress of the development to date. Additionally, it provides a summary of the ABC User’s Guide, identifying the generic requirements any payload must meet to successfully launch. Additional insight is presented as to the type of verifications needed, their expected quality, and timing during the integration schedule. A case study on the integration of the ADAMSAT payload is reviewed, providing a real-life example of lessons learned from the attempt to integrate this Cubesat Dispensing system to the ABC/ Atlas V.