Location

Utah State University

Start Date

10-5-2010 1:30 PM

Description

Structural fatigue, hearing damage, and community disturbances are all consequences of rocket and jet noise, especially as they become more powerful. Noise-reduction schemes require accurate characterization of the noise sources within rocket plumes and jets. Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) measurements were made to visualize the sound field in the jet exhaust region of an F-22 Raptor. This is one of the largest-scale applications of NAH since its development in the 1980s. A scan-based holographic measurement was made using a 90-microphone array with 15 cm regular grid spacing, for four engine power settings. The array was scanned through 93 measurement positions, along three different planes in a region near 7 m from the jet centerline and 23 m downstream. In addition, 50 fixed reference microphones were placed along the ground 11.6 m from the jet centerline, spanning 30.8 m. The reference microphones have been used to perform virtual coherence on the measurement planes. Statistically-optimized NAH (SONAH) has been used to backpropagate the sound field to the source region for low frequencies, and to identify jet noise characteristics. Ground reflection interference and other non-ideal measurement conditions must be dealt with. Details relating to jet coherence lengths and their relation to reference microphone requirements will be discussed. Preliminary results of this ongoing work will be presented. [Work supported by Air Force SBIR.]

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Characterization of High-Power Rocket and Jet Noise Using Near-Field Acoustical Holography

Utah State University

Structural fatigue, hearing damage, and community disturbances are all consequences of rocket and jet noise, especially as they become more powerful. Noise-reduction schemes require accurate characterization of the noise sources within rocket plumes and jets. Nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) measurements were made to visualize the sound field in the jet exhaust region of an F-22 Raptor. This is one of the largest-scale applications of NAH since its development in the 1980s. A scan-based holographic measurement was made using a 90-microphone array with 15 cm regular grid spacing, for four engine power settings. The array was scanned through 93 measurement positions, along three different planes in a region near 7 m from the jet centerline and 23 m downstream. In addition, 50 fixed reference microphones were placed along the ground 11.6 m from the jet centerline, spanning 30.8 m. The reference microphones have been used to perform virtual coherence on the measurement planes. Statistically-optimized NAH (SONAH) has been used to backpropagate the sound field to the source region for low frequencies, and to identify jet noise characteristics. Ground reflection interference and other non-ideal measurement conditions must be dealt with. Details relating to jet coherence lengths and their relation to reference microphone requirements will be discussed. Preliminary results of this ongoing work will be presented. [Work supported by Air Force SBIR.]