Title

Host effects on the phenology, development, and mortality of field populations of the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

Authors

D. W. Langor

Document Type

Article

Journal/Book Title/Conference

The Canadian Entomologist

Publication Date

1989

Issue

2

Volume

121

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

First Page

149

Last Page

157

Abstract

Phenology, fecundity, development, and mortality were studied for co-occurring, declining populations ofDendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins in limber pine and lodgepole pine at two sites in the Porcupine Hills of southwestern Alberta in 1985–1986. Beetles reared in lodgepole pine emerged and attacked new hosts 7–8 days earlier than those in limber pine in 1985. Beetles were able to utilize over two-thirds of the length of each limber pine bole but only about one-third of the length of each lodgepole pine bole. Also, beetles infesting limber pine had significantly higher fecundity, produced more eggs per centimetre of gallery length, and their progeny developed faster and survived better than beetles infesting lodgepole pine. There was no apparent phenological or other barrier that might inhibit gene flow between D. ponderosae populations in limber pine and lodgepole pine. In the area studied, limber pine was a better host for D. ponderosae reproduction, development, and survival than was lodgepole pine. Thus, beetle populations may be able to increase much more quickly in limber pine, arguing for regular monitoring of these populations.

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