Event Title

Student Perceptions of a High-Quality Undergraduate Experience: Implications for Teaching and Learning in Natural Resources

Location

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Conference Room 3

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/

Start Date

3-15-2002 1:00 PM

End Date

3-15-2002 1:30 PM

Description

Richard Light (2001) recently published what many consider to be one of the most insightful treatments of what students think constitutes a high-quality undergraduate experience and what can be done by the academy to create an environment that fosters this experience. It is based on a decade of research involving interviews with more than 1,600 undergraduates (mostly seniors), with questions designed by more than 60 faculty members from more than 20 colleges and universities, and results shared more widely with more than 90 colleges and universities (suggesting broad applicability). We highlighted Light's ten major findings for the participants (largely faculty) in our facilitated discussion session. Then, using breakout groups, we asked them to reflect on their own experiences relative to these major findings and indicate positive and/or negative aspects of each for undergraduate education in natural resources. Below we state each finding and summarize participant responses.

Comments

Recommended Citation Sharik, Terry L.; Wellman, J. Douglas; Banks, Sarah; Byrd, Erick T.; Cardenas, David; and Day, Tricia M. (2002) "Student perceptions of a high-quality undergraduate experience: Implications for teaching and learning in natural resources," Natural Resources and Environmental Issues: Vol. 9, Article 2. Available at: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/iss1/2

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Mar 15th, 1:00 PM Mar 15th, 1:30 PM

Student Perceptions of a High-Quality Undergraduate Experience: Implications for Teaching and Learning in Natural Resources

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Conference Room 3

Richard Light (2001) recently published what many consider to be one of the most insightful treatments of what students think constitutes a high-quality undergraduate experience and what can be done by the academy to create an environment that fosters this experience. It is based on a decade of research involving interviews with more than 1,600 undergraduates (mostly seniors), with questions designed by more than 60 faculty members from more than 20 colleges and universities, and results shared more widely with more than 90 colleges and universities (suggesting broad applicability). We highlighted Light's ten major findings for the participants (largely faculty) in our facilitated discussion session. Then, using breakout groups, we asked them to reflect on their own experiences relative to these major findings and indicate positive and/or negative aspects of each for undergraduate education in natural resources. Below we state each finding and summarize participant responses.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/4thBiennial/discussions/10