Event Title

What to Teach in Forest Management and How to Teach It

Presenter Information

Marc E. McDill

Location

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Conference Room 3

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/

Start Date

3-16-2002 3:00 PM

End Date

3-16-2002 3:30 PM

Description

More than ever, forest management today encompasses a wide range of topics, from ecosystem management and public forest planning to the details of industrial timber management, including financial analysis. The discussion will provide a forum where individuals who teach forest management can discuss their ideas on what should be emphasized in forest management classes and effective methods for teaching these concepts. As preparation for the conference, I will obtain syllabi for forest management classes around the country and internationally. These will be used to develop a list of the range of subjects currently taught in these classes and methods used for teaching them. A synopsis of this review, including copies of all of the syllabi that are obtained, will be distributed to participants. The desired outcome of the discussion is that forest management instructors will revisit their current course content and teaching methods, possibly identifying needed changes in emphasis and/or new teaching approaches. The discussion will involve all those who show up.

Comments

Recommended Citation McDill, Marc E. (2002) "What to teach in forest management and how to teach it," Natural Resources and Environmental Issues: Vol. 9, Article 54. Available at: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/iss1/54

 
Mar 16th, 3:00 PM Mar 16th, 3:30 PM

What to Teach in Forest Management and How to Teach It

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Conference Room 3

More than ever, forest management today encompasses a wide range of topics, from ecosystem management and public forest planning to the details of industrial timber management, including financial analysis. The discussion will provide a forum where individuals who teach forest management can discuss their ideas on what should be emphasized in forest management classes and effective methods for teaching these concepts. As preparation for the conference, I will obtain syllabi for forest management classes around the country and internationally. These will be used to develop a list of the range of subjects currently taught in these classes and methods used for teaching them. A synopsis of this review, including copies of all of the syllabi that are obtained, will be distributed to participants. The desired outcome of the discussion is that forest management instructors will revisit their current course content and teaching methods, possibly identifying needed changes in emphasis and/or new teaching approaches. The discussion will involve all those who show up.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/4thBiennial/discussions/2