Event Title

Leading Study-Abroad Programs: Some Examples from Nicaragua and Panama

Presenter Information

A L. Hammett
B R. Murphy

Location

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Conference Room 3

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/

Start Date

3-15-2002 1:30 PM

End Date

3-15-2002 2:00 PM

Description

During the past five years, Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources has conducted three study-abroad courses in Central America. The classes in Nicaragua and Panama have focused on key factors affecting management of natural resources forestry, watershed management, fisheries, wildlife, and forest products. The format includes field exercises; visits to natural resources projects and agencies; team, classroom, and lab sessions; and self-directed study. Each course is designed to maximize contacts with natural resources management practitioners. Many students return for further study or to work in areas that we visit. The courses are team-taught to involve faculty new to international teaching. Several local students are involved, maximizing cross-fertilization of ideas. The course has lead to increased international involvement of faculty, and new research and outreach projects. The presentation will stress lessons learned and how they have influenced the college's international program.

Comments

Recommended Citation Hammett, A. L. and Murphy, B. R. (2002) "Leading study-abroad programs : Some examples from Nicaragua and Panama," Natural Resources and Environmental Issues: Vol. 9, Article 3. Available at: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/iss1/3

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Mar 15th, 1:30 PM Mar 15th, 2:00 PM

Leading Study-Abroad Programs: Some Examples from Nicaragua and Panama

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Conference Room 3

During the past five years, Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources has conducted three study-abroad courses in Central America. The classes in Nicaragua and Panama have focused on key factors affecting management of natural resources forestry, watershed management, fisheries, wildlife, and forest products. The format includes field exercises; visits to natural resources projects and agencies; team, classroom, and lab sessions; and self-directed study. Each course is designed to maximize contacts with natural resources management practitioners. Many students return for further study or to work in areas that we visit. The courses are team-taught to involve faculty new to international teaching. Several local students are involved, maximizing cross-fertilization of ideas. The course has lead to increased international involvement of faculty, and new research and outreach projects. The presentation will stress lessons learned and how they have influenced the college's international program.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/4thBiennial/discussions/9