Event Title

Rhetoric Associates in Natural Resources: Influences on Undergraduate Education at Utah State University. Part II: Influences on Student Recipients and Faculty

Location

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Classroom 2

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/

Start Date

3-15-2002 10:00 AM

End Date

3-15-2002 10:30 AM

Description

Surveys of undergraduate students in the College of Natural Resources at Utah State University who were mentored by their fellow students in the Rhetoric Associates (RA) Program suggest improved writing and critical-thinking skills, students’ ability to take constructive criticism, and clarification of expectations of the course instructor. Surveys of faculty teaching courses to which RAs have been assigned indicate improved writing skills and greater focus on the content of written assignments, reduced demands on the instructor's time, increased satisfaction from working with talented undergraduate mentors, and benefits associated with RAs serving as mediators.

Comments

Session 2. Rhetoric and writing. Recommended Citation: Sharik, Terry; Brunson, Mark; Anderson, Claudia; Kartchner, Summer; Pollock, Bowdie; and Kinkead, Joyce (2002) "Rhetoric associates in natural resources: Influences on undergraduate education at Utah State University. Part II: Influences on student recipients and faculty," Natural Resources and Environmental Issues: Vol. 9, Article 11. Available at: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/iss1/11

 
Mar 15th, 10:00 AM Mar 15th, 10:30 AM

Rhetoric Associates in Natural Resources: Influences on Undergraduate Education at Utah State University. Part II: Influences on Student Recipients and Faculty

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Classroom 2

Surveys of undergraduate students in the College of Natural Resources at Utah State University who were mentored by their fellow students in the Rhetoric Associates (RA) Program suggest improved writing and critical-thinking skills, students’ ability to take constructive criticism, and clarification of expectations of the course instructor. Surveys of faculty teaching courses to which RAs have been assigned indicate improved writing skills and greater focus on the content of written assignments, reduced demands on the instructor's time, increased satisfaction from working with talented undergraduate mentors, and benefits associated with RAs serving as mediators.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/4thBiennial/sessions/2