Event Title

Distance Education in Fire Ecology

Presenter Information

Mark D. Reed

Location

McKimmon Conference & Training Center Classroom 2

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/iss1/

Start Date

3-15-2002 2:00 PM

End Date

3-15-2002 2:30 PM

Description

Oregon State University is developing a new distance education course in Wildland Fire Ecology. Professors from the departments of Forest Management, Forest Science, Rangeland Resources, and Fisheries and Wildlife are involved, as well as guest lecturers from BLM, Forest Service, and USGS. Course delivery will be via videotape and Blackboard Web pages. The six professors involved in designing the course initially were skeptical about the potential of distance education. However, they soon realized several advantages of this mode of education: being able to take students, via videotaped field trips, to many diverse biomes during any season of the year; bringing in a number of guest lecturers from different regions of the country; and developing case studies from different parts of the world. The instructors also realized some limitations, including the need to make text and graphics larger than usual so that they will be clear and legible on videotape. The course will initially be taught to a live class at Oregon State University during Winter quarter 2002. Students will be asked for constructive criticism of the video modules and Web pages. Feedback from this test group will be used to refine the course content for initial distance delivery in fall of 2002.

Comments

Session 5. Teaching Techniques. Recommended Citation: Reed, Mark (2002) "Distance education in fire ecology," Natural Resources and Environmental Issues: Vol. 9, Article 22. Available at: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/iss1/22

 
Mar 15th, 2:00 PM Mar 15th, 2:30 PM

Distance Education in Fire Ecology

McKimmon Conference & Training Center Classroom 2

Oregon State University is developing a new distance education course in Wildland Fire Ecology. Professors from the departments of Forest Management, Forest Science, Rangeland Resources, and Fisheries and Wildlife are involved, as well as guest lecturers from BLM, Forest Service, and USGS. Course delivery will be via videotape and Blackboard Web pages. The six professors involved in designing the course initially were skeptical about the potential of distance education. However, they soon realized several advantages of this mode of education: being able to take students, via videotaped field trips, to many diverse biomes during any season of the year; bringing in a number of guest lecturers from different regions of the country; and developing case studies from different parts of the world. The instructors also realized some limitations, including the need to make text and graphics larger than usual so that they will be clear and legible on videotape. The course will initially be taught to a live class at Oregon State University during Winter quarter 2002. Students will be asked for constructive criticism of the video modules and Web pages. Feedback from this test group will be used to refine the course content for initial distance delivery in fall of 2002.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/4thBiennial/sessions/21