Event Title

Integrating Spatial Information Technologies into Natural Resources Curricula

Presenter Information

Heather Cheshire
George Hess

Location

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Conference Room 3

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/

Start Date

3-16-2002 11:00 AM

End Date

3-16-2002 12:00 PM

Description

Spatial information technologies increasingly are used in forestry and natural resources management and research. Our long-term goal is to provide students with hands-on exposure to these technologies from the moment they enter their undergraduate natural resource curricula until they graduate, by integrating spatial information technology into a number of key courses. We have designed a prototype laboratory sequence in which students use geographic information systems, global positioning systems, and statistical sampling techniques in an integrated process to estimate forest basal area. Participants in this workshop will experience our approach from the students’ perspectives. We will present our rationale for each step in the sequence and discuss with participants methods for improving and extending the concept. Workshop participants will have half of the time for hands-on activities interspersed with discussion. Participants will be invited to discuss and/or demonstrate activities that they have used in their classes.

Comments

Recommended Citation Cheshire, Heather and Hess, George (2002) "Integrating spatial information technologies into natural resources curricula," Natural Resources and Environmental Issues: Vol. 9, Article 48. Available at: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol9/iss1/48

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Mar 16th, 11:00 AM Mar 16th, 12:00 PM

Integrating Spatial Information Technologies into Natural Resources Curricula

McKimmon Conference & Training Center / Conference Room 3

Spatial information technologies increasingly are used in forestry and natural resources management and research. Our long-term goal is to provide students with hands-on exposure to these technologies from the moment they enter their undergraduate natural resource curricula until they graduate, by integrating spatial information technology into a number of key courses. We have designed a prototype laboratory sequence in which students use geographic information systems, global positioning systems, and statistical sampling techniques in an integrated process to estimate forest basal area. Participants in this workshop will experience our approach from the students’ perspectives. We will present our rationale for each step in the sequence and discuss with participants methods for improving and extending the concept. Workshop participants will have half of the time for hands-on activities interspersed with discussion. Participants will be invited to discuss and/or demonstrate activities that they have used in their classes.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/4thBiennial/workshops/5