Event Title

Building Professionally-Based Communities of Learning among Faculty, Students, and Practioners

Location

Agassiz / High Country Conference Center

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol12/

Start Date

3-16-2004 10:00 AM

End Date

3-16-2004 10:30 AM

Description

Residential and non-residential “communities of learning” have been used within institutions of higher education as formal methods to enhance interactions among individuals that ultimately helps learning. Typically, these communities have included student-to-student and faculty-to-student interactions within residential living areas, teams in a core of courses, or teams of students within a course. If students are to develop into leaders within their respective disciplines an additional component that should be integrated into communities of learning is practioners. The objectives of our paper are to describe: 1) communities of learning and why they should be established for all students to enhance learning, 2) how to integrate a community of learning into its respective community of practice, 3) models of communities of learning and their characteristics, and 4) what roles natural resource practitioners, faculty, and students can play in developing and maintaining non-residential communities of learning to meet academic and professional objectives. Ultimately, the integration of faculty, students, and practioners for developing and maintaining learning communities will help create an educational culture that produces life-long learners and leaders in natural resources

Comments

Session 6. Experiential Learning. Recommended Citation: Campa, Henry; Taylor, William W.; Winterstein, Scott R.; and Felix, Alexandra B. (2004) "Building professionally-based communities of learning among faculty, students, and practitioners," Natural Resources and Environmental Issues: Vol. 12, Article 35. Available at: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol12/iss1/35

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Mar 16th, 10:00 AM Mar 16th, 10:30 AM

Building Professionally-Based Communities of Learning among Faculty, Students, and Practioners

Agassiz / High Country Conference Center

Residential and non-residential “communities of learning” have been used within institutions of higher education as formal methods to enhance interactions among individuals that ultimately helps learning. Typically, these communities have included student-to-student and faculty-to-student interactions within residential living areas, teams in a core of courses, or teams of students within a course. If students are to develop into leaders within their respective disciplines an additional component that should be integrated into communities of learning is practioners. The objectives of our paper are to describe: 1) communities of learning and why they should be established for all students to enhance learning, 2) how to integrate a community of learning into its respective community of practice, 3) models of communities of learning and their characteristics, and 4) what roles natural resource practitioners, faculty, and students can play in developing and maintaining non-residential communities of learning to meet academic and professional objectives. Ultimately, the integration of faculty, students, and practioners for developing and maintaining learning communities will help create an educational culture that produces life-long learners and leaders in natural resources

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/5thBiennial/Sessions/17