Event Title

Assessing Programmatic and Course Effectiveness in Teaching Using a Community Approach

Location

Rees / High County Conference Center

Event Website

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol12/

Start Date

3-16-2004 11:30 AM

End Date

3-16-2004 12:00 PM

Description

Individual learning is affected by the total learning environment to which students are exposed. Within a small community, such as the Ranger School, students frequently interact with faculty, their families, other college staff members, food service personnel, physical plant personnel, alumni, and even individuals from the local community. As these groups recognize their impact on students’ learning, they take a greater interest in helping to make the learning experience more effective. Our faculty has implemented a process by which each of these groups may contribute ideas and make changes to the non-academic learning experiences of our students. Specific changes to individual academic courses may similarly be improved using a non-threatening assessment process among the faculty members. An example of a community-wide assessment of a dendrology teaching method will be demonstrated.

Comments

Session 13. Assessment/Learning Approaches. Recommended Citation: Bridgen, Michael R.; Savage, James; and Allen, Wayne (2004) "Assessing programmatic and course effectiveness in teaching using a community approach," Natural Resources and Environmental Issues: Vol. 12, Article 19. Available at: http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/nrei/vol12/iss1/19

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Mar 16th, 11:30 AM Mar 16th, 12:00 PM

Assessing Programmatic and Course Effectiveness in Teaching Using a Community Approach

Rees / High County Conference Center

Individual learning is affected by the total learning environment to which students are exposed. Within a small community, such as the Ranger School, students frequently interact with faculty, their families, other college staff members, food service personnel, physical plant personnel, alumni, and even individuals from the local community. As these groups recognize their impact on students’ learning, they take a greater interest in helping to make the learning experience more effective. Our faculty has implemented a process by which each of these groups may contribute ideas and make changes to the non-academic learning experiences of our students. Specific changes to individual academic courses may similarly be improved using a non-threatening assessment process among the faculty members. An example of a community-wide assessment of a dendrology teaching method will be demonstrated.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/5thBiennial/Sessions/31