Event Title

Assessing Geospatial Learning Outcomes: Results and Lessons Learned

Location

Natural Resources Room 108

Event Website

http://uenr.warnercnr.colostate.edu

Start Date

3-24-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

3-24-2012 1:30 PM

Description

Geospatial tools and technologies have become core competencies for natural resource professionals. To equip undergraduates with the needed background, geospatial instructional activities have been integrated across curricula and courses in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University. The effectiveness of the integration and how well students are meeting geospatial objectives are unknown. At the 8th University Education in Natural Resources conference, we presented an outcomes-based assessment framework. Since that time, we have evaluated student attainment of geospatial learning outcomes using tracking questions, rubrics, pre- and post-assignment questionnaires, and incoming and outgoing longitudinal knowledge surveys. Analysis of students’ coursework shows forestry seniors met skills-based, information literacy, and conceptual knowledge outcomes. Natural resources seniors demonstrate adoption and internalization, desired affective outcomes, in their coursework. Analysis of pre- and post-assignment questionnaire data shows increased student learning; however, many improvements were not statistically significant or failed to meet the intended performance target. Analysis of longitudinal knowledge surveys shows students’ awareness of and confidence in their ability to use the tools increased significantly and met the intended performance standard for all curricula analyzed. Data indicate that students have more success with frequently repeated material, and success increases with higher levels of integration. The assessments have helped us identify instructional oversights and burdensome assessment practices. Overall, analysis of current assessment data indicates we are meeting some desired objectives; however, outcomes assessment, while important, is only part of a process for monitoring and improving student learning.

Comments

Citation: Carr, JD et al. 2012. Assessing Geospatial Learning Outcomes: Results and Lessons Learned. Paper Number. UENR 9th Biennial Conference. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Sessions/45/

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Mar 24th, 1:00 PM Mar 24th, 1:30 PM

Assessing Geospatial Learning Outcomes: Results and Lessons Learned

Natural Resources Room 108

Geospatial tools and technologies have become core competencies for natural resource professionals. To equip undergraduates with the needed background, geospatial instructional activities have been integrated across curricula and courses in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University. The effectiveness of the integration and how well students are meeting geospatial objectives are unknown. At the 8th University Education in Natural Resources conference, we presented an outcomes-based assessment framework. Since that time, we have evaluated student attainment of geospatial learning outcomes using tracking questions, rubrics, pre- and post-assignment questionnaires, and incoming and outgoing longitudinal knowledge surveys. Analysis of students’ coursework shows forestry seniors met skills-based, information literacy, and conceptual knowledge outcomes. Natural resources seniors demonstrate adoption and internalization, desired affective outcomes, in their coursework. Analysis of pre- and post-assignment questionnaire data shows increased student learning; however, many improvements were not statistically significant or failed to meet the intended performance target. Analysis of longitudinal knowledge surveys shows students’ awareness of and confidence in their ability to use the tools increased significantly and met the intended performance standard for all curricula analyzed. Data indicate that students have more success with frequently repeated material, and success increases with higher levels of integration. The assessments have helped us identify instructional oversights and burdensome assessment practices. Overall, analysis of current assessment data indicates we are meeting some desired objectives; however, outcomes assessment, while important, is only part of a process for monitoring and improving student learning.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Sessions/45