Event Title

Incorporating Measures of Community in Wildland Fire Preparedness Education

Location

Forestry Room 127

Event Website

http://uenr.warnercnr.colostate.edu

Start Date

3-24-2012 2:45 PM

End Date

3-24-2012 3:15 PM

Description

Using data from a survey of Colorado residents, we examined measures of sense of community (SOC). Respondents were asked to rate fifteen items measuring SOC on a 7-point scale, where 1 = strongly disagree and 7 = strongly agree. McMillan and Chavis (1986) suggest that these items form four dimensions of SOC: membership, influence, reinforcement of needs, and shared emotional connection. The four dimensions of SOC were supported by the data (i.e., Cronbach’s alpha > .80 for all four dimensions). A cluster analysis of the four dimensions of SOC identified three distinct segments of individuals. The first cluster indicated that they felt a strong SOC on all four dimensions. The second cluster felt a more neutral SOC, while the third cluster felt a low SOC on all four dimensions. We hypothesize that individuals with a low SOC will not be as likely to adopt wildfire protection (i.e., defensible space) behaviors. Understanding these segments can help inform future wildland fire educational materials.

Comments

Citation: Vaske, JJ, Absher, JD, Lyon, KM. 2012. Incorporating Measures of Community in Wildland Fire Preparedness Education. 9th UENR Biennial Conference. UENR 9th Biennial Conference. http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Sessions/54/

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 24th, 2:45 PM Mar 24th, 3:15 PM

Incorporating Measures of Community in Wildland Fire Preparedness Education

Forestry Room 127

Using data from a survey of Colorado residents, we examined measures of sense of community (SOC). Respondents were asked to rate fifteen items measuring SOC on a 7-point scale, where 1 = strongly disagree and 7 = strongly agree. McMillan and Chavis (1986) suggest that these items form four dimensions of SOC: membership, influence, reinforcement of needs, and shared emotional connection. The four dimensions of SOC were supported by the data (i.e., Cronbach’s alpha > .80 for all four dimensions). A cluster analysis of the four dimensions of SOC identified three distinct segments of individuals. The first cluster indicated that they felt a strong SOC on all four dimensions. The second cluster felt a more neutral SOC, while the third cluster felt a low SOC on all four dimensions. We hypothesize that individuals with a low SOC will not be as likely to adopt wildfire protection (i.e., defensible space) behaviors. Understanding these segments can help inform future wildland fire educational materials.

https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cuenr/9thBiennial/Sessions/54