Date of Award:

2012

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Psychology

Advisor/Chair:

Renne V. Galliher

Abstract

Multicultural theorists argue that foundational theories of identity development fail to capture the experiences of ethnic and sexual minorities. Likewise, models of ethnic and sexual identity, separately, may not capture experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or questioning (LGBTQ) ethnic minorities. Intersectional models have been proposed that consider the interaction of identity statuses in their real-world context. However, more empirical support for such models is needed. This study represents a preliminary investigation into patterns of identification, values, attitudes, behaviors, and sense of belonging of these LGBTQ ethnic minorities. The patterns that emerged were varied and complex. Demographic questions were structured in a way that allowed participants to describe with complexity their identities, and the intersections among them. Four distinct groups were identified using Q-sort methodology. Both commonalities and important group differences emerged.

Comments

This work made publicly available electronically on May 11, 2012.

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Psychology Commons

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