Date of Award:

1953

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

Advisor/Chair:

John C. Carlisle

Co-Advisor/Chair:

Dr. John C. Carlisle

Abstract

The importance and growth of campus recreation is being felt by leaders throughout the country. Daniels (2, p. 38) summarizes the importance of the total organism in modern education as follows: "Ample justification for a consideration of, the problem of recreation may be found in the latest and most authoritative literature in the field of educat1on, as well as in a direct study of conditions found on many college campuses throughout the country. Rooted firmly in the philosophy of modern educatlon is the thought that the total organism must be given the opportunity for experiences of an all-round nature, with these experiences based on the social and biological needs which enable an individual to live most successfully in relation to his particular social group." Acceptance of this philosophy implies the responsibility of devising ways and means whereby campus recreation purposes may be achieved. By no manner of reasoning can such purposes be realized without due consideration of, and provision for, opportunities in a wide range of recreational activities, such as crafts, music, nature, dramatics, sports, and games. Furthermore, these opportunities must be made available to all students and not merely the most talented and highly trained.

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