Author

Lea J. Cottam

Date of Award:

1980

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Family, Consumer, and Human Development

Department name when degree awarded

Home Economics and Consumer Education

Advisor/Chair:

Jane McCullough

Abstract

Although citizens do not generally consider themselves consumers of public services in the same Sense they consider themselves consumers in the retail marketplace, their demand for public services clearly affects what local government units provide. Citizens are involved daily with the consumption of public urban services; ye t most consumer education textbooks and teaching materials ignore tax supported services.

The purpose of this study was to measure the satisfaction of consumers with certain public urban services, public officials, and several units of government.

Satisfaction was found to be correlated with age, length of residence in the community and the respondents' attitudes toward elected officials. There was no apparent correlation between satisfaction with services and income, education, or assessed valuation of the respondents' dwellings. Satisfaction scores of the four geographic areas sampled were not significantly different.

Respondents did not generally feel they received their money's worth in public services for what they paid in property taxes. They were, however, generally satisfied with the services they received.

Respondents also seemed more likely to voice dissatisfaction to retail distributors than to government agencies.

Comments

Although citizens do not generally consider themselves consumers of public services in the same Sense they consider themselves consumers in the retail marketplace, their demand for public services clearly affects what local government units provide. Citizens are involved daily with the consumption of public urban services; ye t most consumer education textbooks and teaching materials ignore tax supported services.

The purpose of this study was to measure the satisfaction of consumers with certain public urban services, public officials, and several units of government.

Satisfaction was found to be correlated with age, length of residence in the community and the respondents' attitudes toward elected officials. There was no apparent correlation between satisfaction with services and income, education, or assessed valuation of the respondents' dwellings. Satisfaction scores of the four geographic areas sampled were not significantly different.

Respondents did not generally feel they received their money's worth in public services for what they paid in property taxes. They were, however, generally satisfied with the services they received.

Respondents also seemed more likely to voice dissatisfaction to retail distributors than to government agencies.

Share

COinS