Date of Award:

1989

Document Type:

Thesis

Degree Name:

Master of Science (MS)

Department:

Family, Consumer, and Human Development

Department name when degree awarded

Home Economics and Consumer Education

Advisor/Chair:

Jean M. Lown

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine the relationship between completion of a personal financial management course and financial satisfaction, confidence, and practices. The relationship between the use of recommended financial management practices and financial satisfaction and confidence was also examined.

Data for this study were collected through a questionnaire mailed to a sample of Utah State University graduates who had taken a personal financial management course at the university and those who had not. The survey investigated financial satisfaction, confidence in financial management skills, and use of recommended financial management techniques.

Mean financial satisfaction scores were computed by averaging responses to the multi-question six-point Likert scale. Confidence was measured by computing the mean score on a single-question six-point Likert scale. The measurement of use of recommended financial management practices was computed by summing the points assigned for use of recommended practices and the extent to which each was implemented. The recommended financial management practices scores were then divided into three groups: poor, average, and good.

One-way analysis of variance and the Scheffe multiple range test were used to determine if differences existed in the mean scores on financial satisfaction, confidence , and practices between respondents who had completed a college level personal financial management course and those who had not. These tests revealed that there is no significant difference in financial satisfaction, confidence, and practices between subjects who had completed a financial management course and those who had not. There was a significant difference between the groups in the mean number of recommended financial practices used and financial satisfaction and confidence, although mean scores were only separated by one point.

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